Time-resolved CO2 dissociation in a nanosecond pulsed discharge

Luca Matteo Martini, Sara Lovascio, Giorgio Dilecce, Paolo Tosi

Onderzoeksoutput: Bijdrage aan tijdschriftTijdschriftartikelAcademicpeer review

7 Citaties (Scopus)

Uittreksel

Electrical discharges are increasingly used to dissociate CO2 in CO and O2. This reaction is the first step in the way for the synthesis of value-added compounds from CO2 by using renewable electricity. If efficient, this technology might allow at the same time recycling CO2 and storing renewable energy in chemical form. At present, while the dissociation degree is measured in the reactor exhaust, little is experimentally known about the dissociation kinetics in the discharge and post-discharge. This knowledge is however critical to increasing the overall efficiency of the plasma process. To estimate the time dependence of the CO2 dissociation following a discharge event, we have coupled a LIF diagnostics to a nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharge in a mixture of CO2 and H2O. This paper discusses a procedure to obtain data on the time evolution of the CO2 dissociation, its limits and future perspectives. In addition, the local gas temperature is measured as well. We find that a few microseconds after the discharge pulse, CO2 is highly dissociated with a temperature around 2500 K. In about 100 µs, the temperature decreases at about 1500 K while the dissociation is reduced by about a factor of three.

Originele taal-2Engels
Pagina's (van-tot)707-718
Aantal pagina's12
TijdschriftPlasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing
Volume38
Nummer van het tijdschrift4
DOI's
StatusGepubliceerd - 1 jul 2018
Extern gepubliceerdJa

Vingerafdruk

dissociation
Carbon Monoxide
renewable energy
Temperature
Recycling
gas temperature
recycling
electricity
laser induced fluorescence
Electricity
Gases
time dependence
Plasmas
reactors
Kinetics
temperature
kinetics
synthesis
estimates
pulses

Citeer dit

Martini, Luca Matteo ; Lovascio, Sara ; Dilecce, Giorgio ; Tosi, Paolo. / Time-resolved CO2 dissociation in a nanosecond pulsed discharge. In: Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing. 2018 ; Vol. 38, Nr. 4. blz. 707-718.
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Time-resolved CO2 dissociation in a nanosecond pulsed discharge. / Martini, Luca Matteo; Lovascio, Sara; Dilecce, Giorgio; Tosi, Paolo.

In: Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing, Vol. 38, Nr. 4, 01.07.2018, blz. 707-718.

Onderzoeksoutput: Bijdrage aan tijdschriftTijdschriftartikelAcademicpeer review

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