The value of job crafting for work engagement, task performance, and career satisfaction: longitudinal and quasi-experimental evidence

Lonneke Dubbelt, Evangelia Demerouti, Sonja Rispens (Corresponding author)

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We examine how job crafting (i.e. seeking resources, seeking challenges, decreasing demands) increases the person-job fit of employees. In Study 1, we studied job crafting’s effects over time. 111 employees filled out a questionnaire at two time points with 6 months in between. We found that seeking resources behavior at Time 1 positively affected work engagement, task performance, and career satisfaction at Time 2. Decreasing demands at Time 1 negatively affected work engagement, task performance, and career satisfaction at Time 2. In Study 2, we tested a job crafting intervention using a quasi-experimental design (i.e., intervention group, N = 60, and a control group, N = 59). The intervention was successful, as participants in the intervention group increased seeking resources and decreasing demands behaviors. Furthermore, seeking resources behavior was the main driver of increased participants’ work engagement, task performance, and career satisfaction.

TaalEngels
Pagina's300-314
Aantal pagina's15
TijdschriftEuropean Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology
Volume28
Nummer van het tijdschrift3
DOI's
StatusGepubliceerd - 4 mei 2019

Vingerafdruk

Task Performance and Analysis
Task performance
Work engagement
Career satisfaction
Research Design
Control Groups
Resources

Trefwoorden

    Citeer dit

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