The job demands and resources decision making (JD-R-DM) model

H.J. Gordon, E. Demerouti, T. Bipp, P.M. Le Blanc

Onderzoeksoutput: Bijdrage aan tijdschriftTijdschriftartikelAcademicpeer review

8 Citaties (Scopus)

Uittreksel

This study explores the effects of nurses’ daily job characteristics (i.e., job demands and resources) and general work engagement on their daily decision making (i.e., analytical and intuitive) and consequently their daily performance (i.e., task and contextual). Participants completed a baseline questionnaire and a diary for five consecutive days. Results reveal a positive influence of the job demands "work pressure" and "predictability" on analytical decision making. In turn, analytical decision making promotes task performance. Work pressure also negatively influences intuitive decision making which, in turn, stimulates task and contextual performance. However, the job resource (i.e., autonomy) had a nonsignificant relationship with decision making. General work engagement had positive effects on analytical decision making and moderated the relationship between intuitive decision making and contextual performance. For those high on work engagement, the relation was stronger compared to their counterparts low on work engagement. Results corroborate that expanding and testing decision-making theories can increase understanding on how the work environment and engagement influence employee decision making and performance.
TaalEngels
Pagina's44-58
Aantal pagina's15
TijdschriftEuropean Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology
Volume24
Nummer van het tijdschrift1
DOI's
StatusGepubliceerd - 2015

Vingerafdruk

Decision Making
Task Performance and Analysis
Decision Theory
Decision-making model
Job demands
Job resources
Decision making
Pressure
Nurses
Work engagement

Citeer dit

@article{724babdcc31349018db61b550773de62,
title = "The job demands and resources decision making (JD-R-DM) model",
abstract = "This study explores the effects of nurses’ daily job characteristics (i.e., job demands and resources) and general work engagement on their daily decision making (i.e., analytical and intuitive) and consequently their daily performance (i.e., task and contextual). Participants completed a baseline questionnaire and a diary for five consecutive days. Results reveal a positive influence of the job demands {"}work pressure{"} and {"}predictability{"} on analytical decision making. In turn, analytical decision making promotes task performance. Work pressure also negatively influences intuitive decision making which, in turn, stimulates task and contextual performance. However, the job resource (i.e., autonomy) had a nonsignificant relationship with decision making. General work engagement had positive effects on analytical decision making and moderated the relationship between intuitive decision making and contextual performance. For those high on work engagement, the relation was stronger compared to their counterparts low on work engagement. Results corroborate that expanding and testing decision-making theories can increase understanding on how the work environment and engagement influence employee decision making and performance.",
author = "H.J. Gordon and E. Demerouti and T. Bipp and {Le Blanc}, P.M.",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1080/1359432X.2013.842901",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "44--58",
journal = "European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology",
issn = "1359-432X",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

The job demands and resources decision making (JD-R-DM) model. / Gordon, H.J.; Demerouti, E.; Bipp, T.; Le Blanc, P.M.

In: European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, Vol. 24, Nr. 1, 2015, blz. 44-58.

Onderzoeksoutput: Bijdrage aan tijdschriftTijdschriftartikelAcademicpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The job demands and resources decision making (JD-R-DM) model

AU - Gordon,H.J.

AU - Demerouti,E.

AU - Bipp,T.

AU - Le Blanc,P.M.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - This study explores the effects of nurses’ daily job characteristics (i.e., job demands and resources) and general work engagement on their daily decision making (i.e., analytical and intuitive) and consequently their daily performance (i.e., task and contextual). Participants completed a baseline questionnaire and a diary for five consecutive days. Results reveal a positive influence of the job demands "work pressure" and "predictability" on analytical decision making. In turn, analytical decision making promotes task performance. Work pressure also negatively influences intuitive decision making which, in turn, stimulates task and contextual performance. However, the job resource (i.e., autonomy) had a nonsignificant relationship with decision making. General work engagement had positive effects on analytical decision making and moderated the relationship between intuitive decision making and contextual performance. For those high on work engagement, the relation was stronger compared to their counterparts low on work engagement. Results corroborate that expanding and testing decision-making theories can increase understanding on how the work environment and engagement influence employee decision making and performance.

AB - This study explores the effects of nurses’ daily job characteristics (i.e., job demands and resources) and general work engagement on their daily decision making (i.e., analytical and intuitive) and consequently their daily performance (i.e., task and contextual). Participants completed a baseline questionnaire and a diary for five consecutive days. Results reveal a positive influence of the job demands "work pressure" and "predictability" on analytical decision making. In turn, analytical decision making promotes task performance. Work pressure also negatively influences intuitive decision making which, in turn, stimulates task and contextual performance. However, the job resource (i.e., autonomy) had a nonsignificant relationship with decision making. General work engagement had positive effects on analytical decision making and moderated the relationship between intuitive decision making and contextual performance. For those high on work engagement, the relation was stronger compared to their counterparts low on work engagement. Results corroborate that expanding and testing decision-making theories can increase understanding on how the work environment and engagement influence employee decision making and performance.

U2 - 10.1080/1359432X.2013.842901

DO - 10.1080/1359432X.2013.842901

M3 - Article

VL - 24

SP - 44

EP - 58

JO - European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology

T2 - European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology

JF - European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology

SN - 1359-432X

IS - 1

ER -