The historical turf farms of Iceland : Architecture, building technology and the indoor environment

J. Hoof, van, F van Dijken

Onderzoeksoutput: Bijdrage aan tijdschriftTijdschriftartikelAcademicpeer review

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Mineral-based turf has been used as a building material in Iceland for centuries. The vernacular Icelandic architecture is characterised by turf walls and sod roofs. This paper describes the historical development of the various archetypes of Icelandic turf farmhouses, researches the building techniques and materials applied, and qualifies the impact of the building properties on comfort and health of the former occupants. The study consisted of desk research, and a field study at the farmhouse of Glaumbær. In the wet and cold Icelandic climate, turf was an appropriate material that required its own building technology. The material was commonly available in settled areas of the island. Thick turf walls protected the residents against the harsh outdoor conditions, but had little effect on indoor air quality.
Originele taal-2Engels
Pagina's (van-tot)1023-1030
Aantal pagina's8
TijdschriftBuilding and Environment
Volume43
Nummer van het tijdschrift6
DOI's
StatusGepubliceerd - 2008

Vingerafdruk

Iceland
Farms
farm
vernacular architecture
indoor air
Air quality
Roofs
roof
air quality
Minerals
historical development
Health
air
climate
mineral
resident
building technology
indoor environment
material
health

Citeer dit

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title = "The historical turf farms of Iceland : Architecture, building technology and the indoor environment",
abstract = "Mineral-based turf has been used as a building material in Iceland for centuries. The vernacular Icelandic architecture is characterised by turf walls and sod roofs. This paper describes the historical development of the various archetypes of Icelandic turf farmhouses, researches the building techniques and materials applied, and qualifies the impact of the building properties on comfort and health of the former occupants. The study consisted of desk research, and a field study at the farmhouse of Glaumb{\ae}r. In the wet and cold Icelandic climate, turf was an appropriate material that required its own building technology. The material was commonly available in settled areas of the island. Thick turf walls protected the residents against the harsh outdoor conditions, but had little effect on indoor air quality.",
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The historical turf farms of Iceland : Architecture, building technology and the indoor environment. / Hoof, van, J.; van Dijken, F.

In: Building and Environment, Vol. 43, Nr. 6, 2008, blz. 1023-1030.

Onderzoeksoutput: Bijdrage aan tijdschriftTijdschriftartikelAcademicpeer review

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