Revealing the Cell-Material Interface with Nanometer Resolution by Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy

F. Santoro, W. Zhao, L.M. Joubert, L. Duan, J. Schnitker, Y. van de Burgt, H.Y. Lou, B. Liu, A. Salleo, L. Cui, Yi Cui, B. Cui

Onderzoeksoutput: Bijdrage aan tijdschriftTijdschriftartikelAcademicpeer review

36 Citaties (Scopus)

Uittreksel

The interface between cells and nonbiological surfaces regulates cell attachment, chronic tissue responses, and ultimately the success of medical implants or biosensors. Clinical and laboratory studies show that topological features of the surface profoundly influence cellular responses; for example, titanium surfaces with nano- and microtopographical structures enhance osteoblast attachment and host-implant integration as compared to a smooth surface. To understand how cells and tissues respond to different topographical features, it is of critical importance to directly visualize the cell-material interface at the relevant nanometer length scale. Here, we present a method for in situ examination of the cell-to-material interface at any desired location, based on focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy imaging to resolve the cell membrane-to-material interface with 10 nm resolution. By examining how cell membranes interact with topographical features such as nanoscale protrusions or invaginations, we discovered that the cell membrane readily deforms inward and wraps around protruding structures, but hardly deforms outward to contour invaginating structures. This asymmetric membrane response (inward vs outward deformation) causes the cleft width between the cell membrane and the nanostructure surface to vary by more than an order of magnitude. Our results suggest that surface topology is a crucial consideration for the development of medical implants or biosensors whose performances are strongly influenced by the cell-to-material interface. We anticipate that the method can be used to explore the direct interaction of cells/tissue with medical devices such as metal implants in the future.

TaalEngels
Pagina's8320-8328
Aantal pagina's9
TijdschriftACS Nano
Volume11
Nummer van het tijdschrift8
DOI's
StatusGepubliceerd - 22 aug 2017

Vingerafdruk

Focused ion beams
ion beams
Cell membranes
Scanning electron microscopy
scanning electron microscopy
cells
Tissue
Biosensors
bioinstrumentation
attachment
Osteoblasts
osteoblasts
wrap
Titanium
Nanostructures
Topology
topology
Membranes
titanium
Imaging techniques

Trefwoorden

    Citeer dit

    Santoro, F., Zhao, W., Joubert, L. M., Duan, L., Schnitker, J., van de Burgt, Y., ... Cui, B. (2017). Revealing the Cell-Material Interface with Nanometer Resolution by Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy. ACS Nano, 11(8), 8320-8328. DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.7b03494
    Santoro, F. ; Zhao, W. ; Joubert, L.M. ; Duan, L. ; Schnitker, J. ; van de Burgt, Y. ; Lou, H.Y. ; Liu, B. ; Salleo, A. ; Cui, L. ; Cui, Yi ; Cui, B./ Revealing the Cell-Material Interface with Nanometer Resolution by Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy. In: ACS Nano. 2017 ; Vol. 11, Nr. 8. blz. 8320-8328
    @article{2eef28ff47d74f13a153294340bf2019,
    title = "Revealing the Cell-Material Interface with Nanometer Resolution by Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy",
    abstract = "The interface between cells and nonbiological surfaces regulates cell attachment, chronic tissue responses, and ultimately the success of medical implants or biosensors. Clinical and laboratory studies show that topological features of the surface profoundly influence cellular responses; for example, titanium surfaces with nano- and microtopographical structures enhance osteoblast attachment and host-implant integration as compared to a smooth surface. To understand how cells and tissues respond to different topographical features, it is of critical importance to directly visualize the cell-material interface at the relevant nanometer length scale. Here, we present a method for in situ examination of the cell-to-material interface at any desired location, based on focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy imaging to resolve the cell membrane-to-material interface with 10 nm resolution. By examining how cell membranes interact with topographical features such as nanoscale protrusions or invaginations, we discovered that the cell membrane readily deforms inward and wraps around protruding structures, but hardly deforms outward to contour invaginating structures. This asymmetric membrane response (inward vs outward deformation) causes the cleft width between the cell membrane and the nanostructure surface to vary by more than an order of magnitude. Our results suggest that surface topology is a crucial consideration for the development of medical implants or biosensors whose performances are strongly influenced by the cell-to-material interface. We anticipate that the method can be used to explore the direct interaction of cells/tissue with medical devices such as metal implants in the future.",
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    author = "F. Santoro and W. Zhao and L.M. Joubert and L. Duan and J. Schnitker and {van de Burgt}, Y. and H.Y. Lou and B. Liu and A. Salleo and L. Cui and Yi Cui and B. Cui",
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    Santoro, F, Zhao, W, Joubert, LM, Duan, L, Schnitker, J, van de Burgt, Y, Lou, HY, Liu, B, Salleo, A, Cui, L, Cui, Y & Cui, B 2017, 'Revealing the Cell-Material Interface with Nanometer Resolution by Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy' ACS Nano, vol. 11, nr. 8, blz. 8320-8328. DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.7b03494

    Revealing the Cell-Material Interface with Nanometer Resolution by Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy. / Santoro, F.; Zhao, W.; Joubert, L.M.; Duan, L.; Schnitker, J.; van de Burgt, Y.; Lou, H.Y.; Liu, B.; Salleo, A.; Cui, L.; Cui, Yi; Cui, B.

    In: ACS Nano, Vol. 11, Nr. 8, 22.08.2017, blz. 8320-8328.

    Onderzoeksoutput: Bijdrage aan tijdschriftTijdschriftartikelAcademicpeer review

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    T1 - Revealing the Cell-Material Interface with Nanometer Resolution by Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy

    AU - Santoro,F.

    AU - Zhao,W.

    AU - Joubert,L.M.

    AU - Duan,L.

    AU - Schnitker,J.

    AU - van de Burgt,Y.

    AU - Lou,H.Y.

    AU - Liu,B.

    AU - Salleo,A.

    AU - Cui,L.

    AU - Cui,Yi

    AU - Cui,B.

    PY - 2017/8/22

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    N2 - The interface between cells and nonbiological surfaces regulates cell attachment, chronic tissue responses, and ultimately the success of medical implants or biosensors. Clinical and laboratory studies show that topological features of the surface profoundly influence cellular responses; for example, titanium surfaces with nano- and microtopographical structures enhance osteoblast attachment and host-implant integration as compared to a smooth surface. To understand how cells and tissues respond to different topographical features, it is of critical importance to directly visualize the cell-material interface at the relevant nanometer length scale. Here, we present a method for in situ examination of the cell-to-material interface at any desired location, based on focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy imaging to resolve the cell membrane-to-material interface with 10 nm resolution. By examining how cell membranes interact with topographical features such as nanoscale protrusions or invaginations, we discovered that the cell membrane readily deforms inward and wraps around protruding structures, but hardly deforms outward to contour invaginating structures. This asymmetric membrane response (inward vs outward deformation) causes the cleft width between the cell membrane and the nanostructure surface to vary by more than an order of magnitude. Our results suggest that surface topology is a crucial consideration for the development of medical implants or biosensors whose performances are strongly influenced by the cell-to-material interface. We anticipate that the method can be used to explore the direct interaction of cells/tissue with medical devices such as metal implants in the future.

    AB - The interface between cells and nonbiological surfaces regulates cell attachment, chronic tissue responses, and ultimately the success of medical implants or biosensors. Clinical and laboratory studies show that topological features of the surface profoundly influence cellular responses; for example, titanium surfaces with nano- and microtopographical structures enhance osteoblast attachment and host-implant integration as compared to a smooth surface. To understand how cells and tissues respond to different topographical features, it is of critical importance to directly visualize the cell-material interface at the relevant nanometer length scale. Here, we present a method for in situ examination of the cell-to-material interface at any desired location, based on focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy imaging to resolve the cell membrane-to-material interface with 10 nm resolution. By examining how cell membranes interact with topographical features such as nanoscale protrusions or invaginations, we discovered that the cell membrane readily deforms inward and wraps around protruding structures, but hardly deforms outward to contour invaginating structures. This asymmetric membrane response (inward vs outward deformation) causes the cleft width between the cell membrane and the nanostructure surface to vary by more than an order of magnitude. Our results suggest that surface topology is a crucial consideration for the development of medical implants or biosensors whose performances are strongly influenced by the cell-to-material interface. We anticipate that the method can be used to explore the direct interaction of cells/tissue with medical devices such as metal implants in the future.

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    KW - focused ion beam

    KW - nanostructures

    KW - scanning electron microscopy

    KW - ultrathin resin plasticization

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    DO - 10.1021/acsnano.7b03494

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    Santoro F, Zhao W, Joubert LM, Duan L, Schnitker J, van de Burgt Y et al. Revealing the Cell-Material Interface with Nanometer Resolution by Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy. ACS Nano. 2017 aug 22;11(8):8320-8328. Beschikbaar vanaf, DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.7b03494