Proper initial solution to start periodic steady-state-based methods

Giovanni De Luca (Corresponding author), Pascal Bolcato, Wil H.A. Schilders

Onderzoeksoutput: Bijdrage aan tijdschriftTijdschriftartikelAcademicpeer review

Uittreksel

We present a numerical technique that automatically identifies a suitable initial solution to start periodic steady-state methods for simulating non-autonomous circuits at transistor-level. The method avoids the guessing of the initial solution, which may result in divergence of the steady-state method used. For high-Q oscillating circuits, acceleration methods are used to compute the periodic solution. For strongly nonlinear circuits, such as delay-locked loops and switching-mode power supplies, time-domain methods are preferred, e.g., Shooting-Newton. Usually, a number of pre-integration periods is guessed to provide an initial solution for the acceleration method. However, the method may diverge, then the guessing has to be repeated with no clue on the next one. Instead, the technique described here identifies a proper initial solution that makes the method converges, works in the time-domain and makes use of information stored during the integration process, thus is non-invasive for commercial circuit simulators and can be implemented with little effort. Besides, it works in parallel with the integration process, thus computations are cheap to perform. We show experimental results from applying our technique and then start shooting-Newton on five circuits, among which three are industrial and two are strongly nonlinear, that confirm the validity of our mathematical analyses.

TaalEngels
Pagina's1104-1115
TijdschriftIEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I: Regular Papers
Volume66
Nummer van het tijdschrift3
DOI's
StatusGepubliceerd - 1 mrt 2019

Vingerafdruk

Networks (circuits)
Transistors
Simulators

Trefwoorden

    Citeer dit

    @article{72fd15116ee84b50aefb27f6f31c86cc,
    title = "Proper initial solution to start periodic steady-state-based methods",
    abstract = "We present a numerical technique that automatically identifies a suitable initial solution to start periodic steady-state methods for simulating non-autonomous circuits at transistor-level. The method avoids the guessing of the initial solution, which may result in divergence of the steady-state method used. For high-Q oscillating circuits, acceleration methods are used to compute the periodic solution. For strongly nonlinear circuits, such as delay-locked loops and switching-mode power supplies, time-domain methods are preferred, e.g., Shooting-Newton. Usually, a number of pre-integration periods is guessed to provide an initial solution for the acceleration method. However, the method may diverge, then the guessing has to be repeated with no clue on the next one. Instead, the technique described here identifies a proper initial solution that makes the method converges, works in the time-domain and makes use of information stored during the integration process, thus is non-invasive for commercial circuit simulators and can be implemented with little effort. Besides, it works in parallel with the integration process, thus computations are cheap to perform. We show experimental results from applying our technique and then start shooting-Newton on five circuits, among which three are industrial and two are strongly nonlinear, that confirm the validity of our mathematical analyses.",
    keywords = "Computational modeling, Convergence, Extrapolation, mathematical analysis, Mathematical model, non-autonomous nonlinear circuits., Nonlinear circuits, Periodic steady-state methods, Steady-state, Time-domain analysis, time-domain simulation, transistor-level simulation",
    author = "{De Luca}, Giovanni and Pascal Bolcato and Schilders, {Wil H.A.}",
    year = "2019",
    month = "3",
    day = "1",
    doi = "10.1109/TCSI.2018.2874570",
    language = "English",
    volume = "66",
    pages = "1104--1115",
    journal = "IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I: Regular Papers",
    issn = "1549-8328",
    publisher = "Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)",
    number = "3",

    }

    Proper initial solution to start periodic steady-state-based methods. / De Luca, Giovanni (Corresponding author); Bolcato, Pascal; Schilders, Wil H.A.

    In: IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I: Regular Papers, Vol. 66, Nr. 3, 01.03.2019, blz. 1104-1115.

    Onderzoeksoutput: Bijdrage aan tijdschriftTijdschriftartikelAcademicpeer review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Proper initial solution to start periodic steady-state-based methods

    AU - De Luca,Giovanni

    AU - Bolcato,Pascal

    AU - Schilders,Wil H.A.

    PY - 2019/3/1

    Y1 - 2019/3/1

    N2 - We present a numerical technique that automatically identifies a suitable initial solution to start periodic steady-state methods for simulating non-autonomous circuits at transistor-level. The method avoids the guessing of the initial solution, which may result in divergence of the steady-state method used. For high-Q oscillating circuits, acceleration methods are used to compute the periodic solution. For strongly nonlinear circuits, such as delay-locked loops and switching-mode power supplies, time-domain methods are preferred, e.g., Shooting-Newton. Usually, a number of pre-integration periods is guessed to provide an initial solution for the acceleration method. However, the method may diverge, then the guessing has to be repeated with no clue on the next one. Instead, the technique described here identifies a proper initial solution that makes the method converges, works in the time-domain and makes use of information stored during the integration process, thus is non-invasive for commercial circuit simulators and can be implemented with little effort. Besides, it works in parallel with the integration process, thus computations are cheap to perform. We show experimental results from applying our technique and then start shooting-Newton on five circuits, among which three are industrial and two are strongly nonlinear, that confirm the validity of our mathematical analyses.

    AB - We present a numerical technique that automatically identifies a suitable initial solution to start periodic steady-state methods for simulating non-autonomous circuits at transistor-level. The method avoids the guessing of the initial solution, which may result in divergence of the steady-state method used. For high-Q oscillating circuits, acceleration methods are used to compute the periodic solution. For strongly nonlinear circuits, such as delay-locked loops and switching-mode power supplies, time-domain methods are preferred, e.g., Shooting-Newton. Usually, a number of pre-integration periods is guessed to provide an initial solution for the acceleration method. However, the method may diverge, then the guessing has to be repeated with no clue on the next one. Instead, the technique described here identifies a proper initial solution that makes the method converges, works in the time-domain and makes use of information stored during the integration process, thus is non-invasive for commercial circuit simulators and can be implemented with little effort. Besides, it works in parallel with the integration process, thus computations are cheap to perform. We show experimental results from applying our technique and then start shooting-Newton on five circuits, among which three are industrial and two are strongly nonlinear, that confirm the validity of our mathematical analyses.

    KW - Computational modeling

    KW - Convergence

    KW - Extrapolation

    KW - mathematical analysis

    KW - Mathematical model

    KW - non-autonomous nonlinear circuits.

    KW - Nonlinear circuits

    KW - Periodic steady-state methods

    KW - Steady-state

    KW - Time-domain analysis

    KW - time-domain simulation

    KW - transistor-level simulation

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85055877275&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1109/TCSI.2018.2874570

    DO - 10.1109/TCSI.2018.2874570

    M3 - Article

    VL - 66

    SP - 1104

    EP - 1115

    JO - IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I: Regular Papers

    T2 - IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I: Regular Papers

    JF - IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I: Regular Papers

    SN - 1549-8328

    IS - 3

    ER -