Participation in the design of performance management systems: a quasi-experimental field study

P.A.M. Kleingeld, H.F.J.M. Tuijl, van, J.A. Algera

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37 Citaties (Scopus)

Uittreksel

In the literature on the relationship between participation in decision making and performance, a tell-and-sell strategy is considered a viable alternative to participation. In contrast, we argue that in organizational settings, when a sensitive and important issue is at stake, participation of a form to be characterized as formal, long term, direct, and with a high degree of participant influence is more effective than a tell-and-sell strategy. Using a quasi-experimental design with a participation, a tell-and-sell, and a control condition, a ProMES performance management system was implemented in the field service department of a Dutch supplier of photocopiers. Outcome feedback to individual technicians resulted in an average performance increase in the participation condition that was significantly higher than the increase found in the tell-and-sell condition. Satisfaction with the program, and the perceived usefulness of the feedback, were significantly higher in the participation condition. In both experimental conditions, the performance increase was significant compared to the control condition. An explanation for these findings is discussed, as are implications for theory and practice.
TaalEngels
Pagina's831-851
TijdschriftJournal of Organizational Behavior
Volume25
Nummer van het tijdschrift7
DOI's
StatusGepubliceerd - 2004

Vingerafdruk

participation
management
performance
Decision Making
Research Design
field service
technician
supplier
Non-Randomized Controlled Trials
Participation
Performance management systems
Field study
decision making

Citeer dit

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Participation in the design of performance management systems: a quasi-experimental field study. / Kleingeld, P.A.M.; Tuijl, van, H.F.J.M.; Algera, J.A.

In: Journal of Organizational Behavior, Vol. 25, Nr. 7, 2004, blz. 831-851.

Onderzoeksoutput: Bijdrage aan tijdschriftTijdschriftartikelAcademicpeer review

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