Noise in the intensive care unit and its influence on sleep quality: A multicenter observational study in Dutch intensive care units

Koen S. Simons, Eva Verweij, Paul M.C. Lemmens, Sam Jelfs, Munhum Park, Peter E. Spronk, Johannes P.C. Sonneveld, Hilde Marieken Feijen, Marijke S. van der Steen, Armin G. Kohlrausch, Mark van den Boogaard, Cornelis P.C. de Jager

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Uittreksel

Background: High noise levels in the intensive care unit (ICU) are a well-known problem. Little is known about the effect of noise on sleep quality in ICU patients. The study aim is to determine the effect of noise on subjective sleep quality. Methods: This was a multicenter observational study in six Dutch ICUs. Noise recording equipment was installed in 2-4 rooms per ICU. Adult patients were eligible for the study 48 h after ICU admission and were followed up to maximum of five nights in the ICU. Exclusion criteria were presence of delirium and/or inability to be assessed for sleep quality. Sleep was evaluated using the Richards Campbell Sleep Questionnaire (range 0-100 mm). Noise recordings were used for analysis of various auditory parameters, including the number and duration of restorative periods. Hierarchical mixed model regression analysis was used to determine associations between noise and sleep. Results: In total, 64 patients (68% male), mean age 63.9 (± 11.7) years and mean Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score 21.1 (± 7.1) were included. Average sleep quality score was 56 ± 24 mm. The mean of the 24-h average sound pressure levels (LAeq, 24h) was 54.0 dBA (± 2.4). Mixed-effects regression analyses showed that background noise (β =-0.51, p < 0.05) had a negative impact on sleep quality, whereas number of restorative periods (β = 0.53, p < 0.01) and female sex (β = 1.25, p < 0.01) were weakly but significantly correlated with sleep. Conclusions: Noise levels are negatively associated and restorative periods and female gender are positively associated with subjective sleep quality in ICU patients. Trial registration: Www.ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01826799. Registered on 9 April 2013.

TaalEngels
Artikelnummer250
Aantal pagina's8
TijdschriftCritical Care
Volume22
Nummer van het tijdschrift1
DOI's
StatusGepubliceerd - 5 okt 2018

Vingerafdruk

Multicenter Studies
Observational Studies
Intensive Care Units
Noise
Sleep
Regression Analysis
APACHE
Delirium
Pressure
Equipment and Supplies

Trefwoorden

    Citeer dit

    Simons, K. S., Verweij, E., Lemmens, P. M. C., Jelfs, S., Park, M., Spronk, P. E., ... de Jager, C. P. C. (2018). Noise in the intensive care unit and its influence on sleep quality: A multicenter observational study in Dutch intensive care units. Critical Care, 22(1), [250]. DOI: 10.1186/s13054-018-2182-y
    Simons, Koen S. ; Verweij, Eva ; Lemmens, Paul M.C. ; Jelfs, Sam ; Park, Munhum ; Spronk, Peter E. ; Sonneveld, Johannes P.C. ; Feijen, Hilde Marieken ; van der Steen, Marijke S. ; Kohlrausch, Armin G. ; van den Boogaard, Mark ; de Jager, Cornelis P.C./ Noise in the intensive care unit and its influence on sleep quality : A multicenter observational study in Dutch intensive care units. In: Critical Care. 2018 ; Vol. 22, Nr. 1.
    @article{925b56a7262240989320aa51d4279ca0,
    title = "Noise in the intensive care unit and its influence on sleep quality: A multicenter observational study in Dutch intensive care units",
    abstract = "Background: High noise levels in the intensive care unit (ICU) are a well-known problem. Little is known about the effect of noise on sleep quality in ICU patients. The study aim is to determine the effect of noise on subjective sleep quality. Methods: This was a multicenter observational study in six Dutch ICUs. Noise recording equipment was installed in 2-4 rooms per ICU. Adult patients were eligible for the study 48 h after ICU admission and were followed up to maximum of five nights in the ICU. Exclusion criteria were presence of delirium and/or inability to be assessed for sleep quality. Sleep was evaluated using the Richards Campbell Sleep Questionnaire (range 0-100 mm). Noise recordings were used for analysis of various auditory parameters, including the number and duration of restorative periods. Hierarchical mixed model regression analysis was used to determine associations between noise and sleep. Results: In total, 64 patients (68{\%} male), mean age 63.9 (± 11.7) years and mean Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score 21.1 (± 7.1) were included. Average sleep quality score was 56 ± 24 mm. The mean of the 24-h average sound pressure levels (LAeq, 24h) was 54.0 dBA (± 2.4). Mixed-effects regression analyses showed that background noise (β =-0.51, p < 0.05) had a negative impact on sleep quality, whereas number of restorative periods (β = 0.53, p < 0.01) and female sex (β = 1.25, p < 0.01) were weakly but significantly correlated with sleep. Conclusions: Noise levels are negatively associated and restorative periods and female gender are positively associated with subjective sleep quality in ICU patients. Trial registration: Www.ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01826799. Registered on 9 April 2013.",
    keywords = "Critical illness, Intensive care unit, Noise, RCSQ, Sleep quality",
    author = "Simons, {Koen S.} and Eva Verweij and Lemmens, {Paul M.C.} and Sam Jelfs and Munhum Park and Spronk, {Peter E.} and Sonneveld, {Johannes P.C.} and Feijen, {Hilde Marieken} and {van der Steen}, {Marijke S.} and Kohlrausch, {Armin G.} and {van den Boogaard}, Mark and {de Jager}, {Cornelis P.C.}",
    year = "2018",
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    Simons, KS, Verweij, E, Lemmens, PMC, Jelfs, S, Park, M, Spronk, PE, Sonneveld, JPC, Feijen, HM, van der Steen, MS, Kohlrausch, AG, van den Boogaard, M & de Jager, CPC 2018, 'Noise in the intensive care unit and its influence on sleep quality: A multicenter observational study in Dutch intensive care units' Critical Care, vol. 22, nr. 1, 250. DOI: 10.1186/s13054-018-2182-y

    Noise in the intensive care unit and its influence on sleep quality : A multicenter observational study in Dutch intensive care units. / Simons, Koen S.; Verweij, Eva; Lemmens, Paul M.C.; Jelfs, Sam; Park, Munhum; Spronk, Peter E.; Sonneveld, Johannes P.C.; Feijen, Hilde Marieken; van der Steen, Marijke S.; Kohlrausch, Armin G.; van den Boogaard, Mark; de Jager, Cornelis P.C.

    In: Critical Care, Vol. 22, Nr. 1, 250, 05.10.2018.

    Onderzoeksoutput: Bijdrage aan tijdschriftTijdschriftartikelAcademicpeer review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Noise in the intensive care unit and its influence on sleep quality

    T2 - Critical Care Medicine

    AU - Simons,Koen S.

    AU - Verweij,Eva

    AU - Lemmens,Paul M.C.

    AU - Jelfs,Sam

    AU - Park,Munhum

    AU - Spronk,Peter E.

    AU - Sonneveld,Johannes P.C.

    AU - Feijen,Hilde Marieken

    AU - van der Steen,Marijke S.

    AU - Kohlrausch,Armin G.

    AU - van den Boogaard,Mark

    AU - de Jager,Cornelis P.C.

    PY - 2018/10/5

    Y1 - 2018/10/5

    N2 - Background: High noise levels in the intensive care unit (ICU) are a well-known problem. Little is known about the effect of noise on sleep quality in ICU patients. The study aim is to determine the effect of noise on subjective sleep quality. Methods: This was a multicenter observational study in six Dutch ICUs. Noise recording equipment was installed in 2-4 rooms per ICU. Adult patients were eligible for the study 48 h after ICU admission and were followed up to maximum of five nights in the ICU. Exclusion criteria were presence of delirium and/or inability to be assessed for sleep quality. Sleep was evaluated using the Richards Campbell Sleep Questionnaire (range 0-100 mm). Noise recordings were used for analysis of various auditory parameters, including the number and duration of restorative periods. Hierarchical mixed model regression analysis was used to determine associations between noise and sleep. Results: In total, 64 patients (68% male), mean age 63.9 (± 11.7) years and mean Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score 21.1 (± 7.1) were included. Average sleep quality score was 56 ± 24 mm. The mean of the 24-h average sound pressure levels (LAeq, 24h) was 54.0 dBA (± 2.4). Mixed-effects regression analyses showed that background noise (β =-0.51, p < 0.05) had a negative impact on sleep quality, whereas number of restorative periods (β = 0.53, p < 0.01) and female sex (β = 1.25, p < 0.01) were weakly but significantly correlated with sleep. Conclusions: Noise levels are negatively associated and restorative periods and female gender are positively associated with subjective sleep quality in ICU patients. Trial registration: Www.ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01826799. Registered on 9 April 2013.

    AB - Background: High noise levels in the intensive care unit (ICU) are a well-known problem. Little is known about the effect of noise on sleep quality in ICU patients. The study aim is to determine the effect of noise on subjective sleep quality. Methods: This was a multicenter observational study in six Dutch ICUs. Noise recording equipment was installed in 2-4 rooms per ICU. Adult patients were eligible for the study 48 h after ICU admission and were followed up to maximum of five nights in the ICU. Exclusion criteria were presence of delirium and/or inability to be assessed for sleep quality. Sleep was evaluated using the Richards Campbell Sleep Questionnaire (range 0-100 mm). Noise recordings were used for analysis of various auditory parameters, including the number and duration of restorative periods. Hierarchical mixed model regression analysis was used to determine associations between noise and sleep. Results: In total, 64 patients (68% male), mean age 63.9 (± 11.7) years and mean Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score 21.1 (± 7.1) were included. Average sleep quality score was 56 ± 24 mm. The mean of the 24-h average sound pressure levels (LAeq, 24h) was 54.0 dBA (± 2.4). Mixed-effects regression analyses showed that background noise (β =-0.51, p < 0.05) had a negative impact on sleep quality, whereas number of restorative periods (β = 0.53, p < 0.01) and female sex (β = 1.25, p < 0.01) were weakly but significantly correlated with sleep. Conclusions: Noise levels are negatively associated and restorative periods and female gender are positively associated with subjective sleep quality in ICU patients. Trial registration: Www.ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01826799. Registered on 9 April 2013.

    KW - Critical illness

    KW - Intensive care unit

    KW - Noise

    KW - RCSQ

    KW - Sleep quality

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    U2 - 10.1186/s13054-018-2182-y

    DO - 10.1186/s13054-018-2182-y

    M3 - Article

    VL - 22

    JO - Critical Care Medicine

    JF - Critical Care Medicine

    SN - 0090-3493

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    ER -

    Simons KS, Verweij E, Lemmens PMC, Jelfs S, Park M, Spronk PE et al. Noise in the intensive care unit and its influence on sleep quality: A multicenter observational study in Dutch intensive care units. Critical Care. 2018 okt 5;22(1). 250. Beschikbaar vanaf, DOI: 10.1186/s13054-018-2182-y