Muscle blood volume assessment during exercise with Power Doppler Ultrasound

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Assessment of perfusion adaptation in muscle during exercise can provide diagnostic information on cardiac and endothelial diseases. Power Doppler Ultrasound (PDUS) is known for its feasibility in the non-invasive measurement of moving blood volume (MBV), a perfusion related parameter. In this study, we show how PDUS can be used to assess the MBV kinetics in muscle, before, during, and after exercise. In a volunteer study, PDUS signal was obtained continuously on the gastrocnemius muscle and rectus femoris muscle, during calf raise (N=11) and leg extension exercises (N=11), respectively. To test reproducibility, the measurements were repeated on two different days. A clear increase of PDUS signal was obtained in both exercises. MBV kinetics during leg extension and after calf raise are assessed by linear and mono-exponential fitting of the data. The reproducibility of the obtained slope and time constants of the signal increase and decay were moderate to good between measurement days, with intra-class correlations (ICC) values of 0.6 - 0.8. Future studies will focus on protocol standardization and the monitoring of muscle perfusion during whole body exercise.
Originele taal-2Engels
TitelUltrasonics Symposium (IUS), 2016 IEEE International, 18-21 September 2016
Plaats van productiePiscataway
UitgeverijInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
ISBN van elektronische versie978-1-4673-9897-8
DOI's
StatusGepubliceerd - 2016

Vingerafdruk

Doppler Ultrasonography
Blood Volume
Exercise
Muscles
Perfusion
Leg
Quadriceps Muscle
Volunteers
Heart Diseases
Skeletal Muscle

Citeer dit

Heres, H. M., Tchang, B. C. Y., Schoots, T., Rutten, M. C. M., van de Vosse, F. N., & Lopata, R. G. P. (2016). Muscle blood volume assessment during exercise with Power Doppler Ultrasound. In Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS), 2016 IEEE International, 18-21 September 2016 Piscataway: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. https://doi.org/10.1109/ULTSYM.2016.7728776
Heres, H.M. ; Tchang, B.C.Y. ; Schoots, T. ; Rutten, M.C.M. ; van de Vosse, F.N. ; Lopata, R.G.P. / Muscle blood volume assessment during exercise with Power Doppler Ultrasound. Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS), 2016 IEEE International, 18-21 September 2016. Piscataway : Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, 2016.
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title = "Muscle blood volume assessment during exercise with Power Doppler Ultrasound",
abstract = "Assessment of perfusion adaptation in muscle during exercise can provide diagnostic information on cardiac and endothelial diseases. Power Doppler Ultrasound (PDUS) is known for its feasibility in the non-invasive measurement of moving blood volume (MBV), a perfusion related parameter. In this study, we show how PDUS can be used to assess the MBV kinetics in muscle, before, during, and after exercise. In a volunteer study, PDUS signal was obtained continuously on the gastrocnemius muscle and rectus femoris muscle, during calf raise (N=11) and leg extension exercises (N=11), respectively. To test reproducibility, the measurements were repeated on two different days. A clear increase of PDUS signal was obtained in both exercises. MBV kinetics during leg extension and after calf raise are assessed by linear and mono-exponential fitting of the data. The reproducibility of the obtained slope and time constants of the signal increase and decay were moderate to good between measurement days, with intra-class correlations (ICC) values of 0.6 - 0.8. Future studies will focus on protocol standardization and the monitoring of muscle perfusion during whole body exercise.",
author = "H.M. Heres and B.C.Y. Tchang and T. Schoots and M.C.M. Rutten and {van de Vosse}, F.N. and R.G.P. Lopata",
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Heres, HM, Tchang, BCY, Schoots, T, Rutten, MCM, van de Vosse, FN & Lopata, RGP 2016, Muscle blood volume assessment during exercise with Power Doppler Ultrasound. in Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS), 2016 IEEE International, 18-21 September 2016. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Piscataway. https://doi.org/10.1109/ULTSYM.2016.7728776

Muscle blood volume assessment during exercise with Power Doppler Ultrasound. / Heres, H.M.; Tchang, B.C.Y.; Schoots, T.; Rutten, M.C.M.; van de Vosse, F.N.; Lopata, R.G.P.

Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS), 2016 IEEE International, 18-21 September 2016. Piscataway : Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, 2016.

Onderzoeksoutput: Hoofdstuk in Boek/Rapport/CongresprocedureConferentiebijdrageAcademicpeer review

TY - GEN

T1 - Muscle blood volume assessment during exercise with Power Doppler Ultrasound

AU - Heres, H.M.

AU - Tchang, B.C.Y.

AU - Schoots, T.

AU - Rutten, M.C.M.

AU - van de Vosse, F.N.

AU - Lopata, R.G.P.

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N2 - Assessment of perfusion adaptation in muscle during exercise can provide diagnostic information on cardiac and endothelial diseases. Power Doppler Ultrasound (PDUS) is known for its feasibility in the non-invasive measurement of moving blood volume (MBV), a perfusion related parameter. In this study, we show how PDUS can be used to assess the MBV kinetics in muscle, before, during, and after exercise. In a volunteer study, PDUS signal was obtained continuously on the gastrocnemius muscle and rectus femoris muscle, during calf raise (N=11) and leg extension exercises (N=11), respectively. To test reproducibility, the measurements were repeated on two different days. A clear increase of PDUS signal was obtained in both exercises. MBV kinetics during leg extension and after calf raise are assessed by linear and mono-exponential fitting of the data. The reproducibility of the obtained slope and time constants of the signal increase and decay were moderate to good between measurement days, with intra-class correlations (ICC) values of 0.6 - 0.8. Future studies will focus on protocol standardization and the monitoring of muscle perfusion during whole body exercise.

AB - Assessment of perfusion adaptation in muscle during exercise can provide diagnostic information on cardiac and endothelial diseases. Power Doppler Ultrasound (PDUS) is known for its feasibility in the non-invasive measurement of moving blood volume (MBV), a perfusion related parameter. In this study, we show how PDUS can be used to assess the MBV kinetics in muscle, before, during, and after exercise. In a volunteer study, PDUS signal was obtained continuously on the gastrocnemius muscle and rectus femoris muscle, during calf raise (N=11) and leg extension exercises (N=11), respectively. To test reproducibility, the measurements were repeated on two different days. A clear increase of PDUS signal was obtained in both exercises. MBV kinetics during leg extension and after calf raise are assessed by linear and mono-exponential fitting of the data. The reproducibility of the obtained slope and time constants of the signal increase and decay were moderate to good between measurement days, with intra-class correlations (ICC) values of 0.6 - 0.8. Future studies will focus on protocol standardization and the monitoring of muscle perfusion during whole body exercise.

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Heres HM, Tchang BCY, Schoots T, Rutten MCM, van de Vosse FN, Lopata RGP. Muscle blood volume assessment during exercise with Power Doppler Ultrasound. In Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS), 2016 IEEE International, 18-21 September 2016. Piscataway: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. 2016 https://doi.org/10.1109/ULTSYM.2016.7728776