Impact of fuel molecular structure on auto-ignition behavior : design rules for future high performance gasolines

Michael D. Boot, Miao Tian, Emiel J.M. Hensen, S. Mani Sarathy

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54 Citaties (Scopus)
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Uittreksel

At a first glance, ethanol, toluene and methyl tert-butyl ether look nothing alike with respect to their molecular structures. Nevertheless, all share a similarly high octane number. A comprehensive review of the inner workings of such octane boosters has been long overdue, particularly at a time when feedstocks for transport fuels other than crude oil, such as natural gas and biomass, are enjoying a rapidly growing market share. As high octane fuels sell at a considerable premium over gasoline, diesel and jet fuel, new entrants into the refining business should take note and gear their processes towards knock resistant compounds if they are to maximize their respective bottom lines. Starting from crude oil, the route towards this goal is well established. Starting from biomass or natural gas, however, it is less clear what dots on the horizon to aim for. The goal of this paper is to offer insight into the chemistry behind octane boosters and to subsequently distill from this knowledge, taking into account recent advances in engine technology, multiple generic design rules that guarantee good anti-knock performance. Careful analysis of the literature suggests that highly unsaturated (cyclic) compounds are the preferred octane boosters for modern spark-ignition engines. Additional side chains of any variety will dilute this strong performance. Multi-branched paraffins come in distant second place, owing to their negligible sensitivity. Depending on the type and location of functional oxygen groups, oxygenates can have a beneficial, neutral or detrimental impact on anti-knock quality.

Originele taal-2Engels
Pagina's (van-tot)1-25
Aantal pagina's25
TijdschriftProgress in Energy and Combustion Science
Volume60
DOI's
StatusGepubliceerd - 1 jan 2017

Vingerafdruk

Molecular structure
Gasoline
Ignition
Natural gas
Biomass
Crude oil
Antiknock rating
Jet fuel
Petroleum
Diesel fuels
Internal combustion engines
Paraffins
Feedstocks
Refining
Toluene
Gears
Ethers
Ethanol
Engines
Oxygen

Citeer dit

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abstract = "At a first glance, ethanol, toluene and methyl tert-butyl ether look nothing alike with respect to their molecular structures. Nevertheless, all share a similarly high octane number. A comprehensive review of the inner workings of such octane boosters has been long overdue, particularly at a time when feedstocks for transport fuels other than crude oil, such as natural gas and biomass, are enjoying a rapidly growing market share. As high octane fuels sell at a considerable premium over gasoline, diesel and jet fuel, new entrants into the refining business should take note and gear their processes towards knock resistant compounds if they are to maximize their respective bottom lines. Starting from crude oil, the route towards this goal is well established. Starting from biomass or natural gas, however, it is less clear what dots on the horizon to aim for. The goal of this paper is to offer insight into the chemistry behind octane boosters and to subsequently distill from this knowledge, taking into account recent advances in engine technology, multiple generic design rules that guarantee good anti-knock performance. Careful analysis of the literature suggests that highly unsaturated (cyclic) compounds are the preferred octane boosters for modern spark-ignition engines. Additional side chains of any variety will dilute this strong performance. Multi-branched paraffins come in distant second place, owing to their negligible sensitivity. Depending on the type and location of functional oxygen groups, oxygenates can have a beneficial, neutral or detrimental impact on anti-knock quality.",
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Impact of fuel molecular structure on auto-ignition behavior : design rules for future high performance gasolines. / Boot, Michael D.; Tian, Miao; Hensen, Emiel J.M.; Mani Sarathy, S.

In: Progress in Energy and Combustion Science, Vol. 60, 01.01.2017, blz. 1-25.

Onderzoeksoutput: Bijdrage aan tijdschriftArtikel recenserenAcademicpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of fuel molecular structure on auto-ignition behavior : design rules for future high performance gasolines

AU - Boot, Michael D.

AU - Tian, Miao

AU - Hensen, Emiel J.M.

AU - Mani Sarathy, S.

PY - 2017/1/1

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AB - At a first glance, ethanol, toluene and methyl tert-butyl ether look nothing alike with respect to their molecular structures. Nevertheless, all share a similarly high octane number. A comprehensive review of the inner workings of such octane boosters has been long overdue, particularly at a time when feedstocks for transport fuels other than crude oil, such as natural gas and biomass, are enjoying a rapidly growing market share. As high octane fuels sell at a considerable premium over gasoline, diesel and jet fuel, new entrants into the refining business should take note and gear their processes towards knock resistant compounds if they are to maximize their respective bottom lines. Starting from crude oil, the route towards this goal is well established. Starting from biomass or natural gas, however, it is less clear what dots on the horizon to aim for. The goal of this paper is to offer insight into the chemistry behind octane boosters and to subsequently distill from this knowledge, taking into account recent advances in engine technology, multiple generic design rules that guarantee good anti-knock performance. Careful analysis of the literature suggests that highly unsaturated (cyclic) compounds are the preferred octane boosters for modern spark-ignition engines. Additional side chains of any variety will dilute this strong performance. Multi-branched paraffins come in distant second place, owing to their negligible sensitivity. Depending on the type and location of functional oxygen groups, oxygenates can have a beneficial, neutral or detrimental impact on anti-knock quality.

KW - Auto-ignition

KW - Downsizing

KW - Gasoline

KW - Knock

KW - Octane

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