Can business development services practitioners learn from theories on innovation and services marketing?

H.A. Romijn, M.C.J. Caniëls, M. Ruijter-de Wildt, de

Onderzoeksoutput: Boek/rapportRapportAcademic

Uittreksel

Business Development Services programmes for non-financial support to small enterprises in developing countries recently have become big business for development donors and NGOs. The approach revolves around the idea that so-called ‘demand-driven’ interventions are the key to successful market development. Yet, the impact of many of these programmes continues to be limited. In this paper we suggest a possibly important cause for this impact problem by examining the current best practice BDS support model in the light of modern theories of innovation and current approaches to services marketing management. The insights emerging from these literatures point towards a still simplified understanding, in the current BDS support paradigm, of how new markets for services actually develop. We suggest that BDS practice should move away from its current short-termist ‘gap-filling’ approach towards service introduction, with its overriding concern about sales volume and short-term profit generated through short-term market transactions. Instead we suggest that BDS should move towards an evolutionary approach, which is built on the recognition that service innovations evolve in iterative fashion through continuous interaction between the market parties. In this alternative model, BDS customers are no longer seen as mere buyers of services and respondents in one-shot market surveys. They co-develop and co-produce new services in partnership with suppliers.
TaalEngels
Plaats van productieEindhoven
UitgeverijTechnische Universiteit Eindhoven
Aantal pagina's23
StatusGepubliceerd - 2003

Publicatie series

NaamECIS working paper series
Volume200307

Vingerafdruk

Business development
Innovation
Services marketing
Service innovation
Small enterprises
Non-governmental organizations
Marketing management
New services
Interaction
Suppliers
Market development
Market survey
Buyers
Profit
Best practice
New markets
Paradigm
Alternative models
Developing countries
Evolutionary

Citeer dit

Romijn, H. A., Caniëls, M. C. J., & Ruijter-de Wildt, de, M. (2003). Can business development services practitioners learn from theories on innovation and services marketing? (ECIS working paper series; Vol. 200307). Eindhoven: Technische Universiteit Eindhoven.
Romijn, H.A. ; Caniëls, M.C.J. ; Ruijter-de Wildt, de, M./ Can business development services practitioners learn from theories on innovation and services marketing?. Eindhoven : Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2003. 23 blz. (ECIS working paper series).
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Romijn, HA, Caniëls, MCJ & Ruijter-de Wildt, de, M 2003, Can business development services practitioners learn from theories on innovation and services marketing? ECIS working paper series, vol. 200307, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Eindhoven.

Can business development services practitioners learn from theories on innovation and services marketing? / Romijn, H.A.; Caniëls, M.C.J.; Ruijter-de Wildt, de, M.

Eindhoven : Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2003. 23 blz. (ECIS working paper series; Vol. 200307).

Onderzoeksoutput: Boek/rapportRapportAcademic

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Romijn HA, Caniëls MCJ, Ruijter-de Wildt, de M. Can business development services practitioners learn from theories on innovation and services marketing? Eindhoven: Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2003. 23 blz. (ECIS working paper series).