Bioinspired magnetite synthesis via solid precursor phases

J.J.M. Lenders, G. Mirabello, N.A.J.M. Sommerdijk

Onderzoeksoutput: Bijdrage aan tijdschriftTijdschriftartikelAcademicpeer review

1 Citaat (Scopus)
82 Downloads (Pure)

Uittreksel

Living organisms often exploit solid but poorly ordered mineral phases as precursors in the biomineralization of their inorganic body parts. Generally speaking, such precursor-based approaches allow the organisms-without the need of high supersaturation levels-to accumulate significant quantities of mineral material at the desired place and time, where they can be molded and crystallized into the right morphology and structure. This strategy is also of interest in the field of bioinspired materials science, as it potentially enables the bottom-up creation of novel materials with equal or improved functionality as compared to Nature, in water and at ambient temperatures. Also for the biomineralization of magnetite (Fe3O4) such a strategy has been reported: ferrihydrite, a poorly crystalline iron oxide, has been identified as a precursor for the final magnetite phase in the magnetosomes of magnetotactic bacteria as well as in the outer layers of chiton teeth. In this perspective, we discuss the efforts of us and others to understand and tune the nucleation and growth of magnetite crystals to date, in aqueous, room-temperature syntheses and employing different solid precursor phases. The various examples demonstrate the importance of the precursor approach in controlling the different properties of magnetite nanoparticles.

Originele taal-2Engels
Pagina's (van-tot)5624-5634
Aantal pagina's11
TijdschriftChemical Science
Volume7
Nummer van het tijdschrift9
DOI's
StatusGepubliceerd - 2016

Vingerafdruk

Ferrosoferric Oxide
Biomineralization
Minerals
Magnetite Nanoparticles
Supersaturation
Materials science
Bacteria
Nucleation
Crystalline materials
Temperature
Crystals
Water

Citeer dit

Lenders, J.J.M. ; Mirabello, G. ; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M. / Bioinspired magnetite synthesis via solid precursor phases. In: Chemical Science. 2016 ; Vol. 7, Nr. 9. blz. 5624-5634.
@article{49eeaf0269084412895d6c4b75f91613,
title = "Bioinspired magnetite synthesis via solid precursor phases",
abstract = "Living organisms often exploit solid but poorly ordered mineral phases as precursors in the biomineralization of their inorganic body parts. Generally speaking, such precursor-based approaches allow the organisms-without the need of high supersaturation levels-to accumulate significant quantities of mineral material at the desired place and time, where they can be molded and crystallized into the right morphology and structure. This strategy is also of interest in the field of bioinspired materials science, as it potentially enables the bottom-up creation of novel materials with equal or improved functionality as compared to Nature, in water and at ambient temperatures. Also for the biomineralization of magnetite (Fe3O4) such a strategy has been reported: ferrihydrite, a poorly crystalline iron oxide, has been identified as a precursor for the final magnetite phase in the magnetosomes of magnetotactic bacteria as well as in the outer layers of chiton teeth. In this perspective, we discuss the efforts of us and others to understand and tune the nucleation and growth of magnetite crystals to date, in aqueous, room-temperature syntheses and employing different solid precursor phases. The various examples demonstrate the importance of the precursor approach in controlling the different properties of magnetite nanoparticles.",
author = "J.J.M. Lenders and G. Mirabello and N.A.J.M. Sommerdijk",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1039/c6sc00523c",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "5624--5634",
journal = "Chemical Science",
issn = "2041-6520",
publisher = "Royal Society of Chemistry",
number = "9",

}

Bioinspired magnetite synthesis via solid precursor phases. / Lenders, J.J.M.; Mirabello, G.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.

In: Chemical Science, Vol. 7, Nr. 9, 2016, blz. 5624-5634.

Onderzoeksoutput: Bijdrage aan tijdschriftTijdschriftartikelAcademicpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bioinspired magnetite synthesis via solid precursor phases

AU - Lenders, J.J.M.

AU - Mirabello, G.

AU - Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Living organisms often exploit solid but poorly ordered mineral phases as precursors in the biomineralization of their inorganic body parts. Generally speaking, such precursor-based approaches allow the organisms-without the need of high supersaturation levels-to accumulate significant quantities of mineral material at the desired place and time, where they can be molded and crystallized into the right morphology and structure. This strategy is also of interest in the field of bioinspired materials science, as it potentially enables the bottom-up creation of novel materials with equal or improved functionality as compared to Nature, in water and at ambient temperatures. Also for the biomineralization of magnetite (Fe3O4) such a strategy has been reported: ferrihydrite, a poorly crystalline iron oxide, has been identified as a precursor for the final magnetite phase in the magnetosomes of magnetotactic bacteria as well as in the outer layers of chiton teeth. In this perspective, we discuss the efforts of us and others to understand and tune the nucleation and growth of magnetite crystals to date, in aqueous, room-temperature syntheses and employing different solid precursor phases. The various examples demonstrate the importance of the precursor approach in controlling the different properties of magnetite nanoparticles.

AB - Living organisms often exploit solid but poorly ordered mineral phases as precursors in the biomineralization of their inorganic body parts. Generally speaking, such precursor-based approaches allow the organisms-without the need of high supersaturation levels-to accumulate significant quantities of mineral material at the desired place and time, where they can be molded and crystallized into the right morphology and structure. This strategy is also of interest in the field of bioinspired materials science, as it potentially enables the bottom-up creation of novel materials with equal or improved functionality as compared to Nature, in water and at ambient temperatures. Also for the biomineralization of magnetite (Fe3O4) such a strategy has been reported: ferrihydrite, a poorly crystalline iron oxide, has been identified as a precursor for the final magnetite phase in the magnetosomes of magnetotactic bacteria as well as in the outer layers of chiton teeth. In this perspective, we discuss the efforts of us and others to understand and tune the nucleation and growth of magnetite crystals to date, in aqueous, room-temperature syntheses and employing different solid precursor phases. The various examples demonstrate the importance of the precursor approach in controlling the different properties of magnetite nanoparticles.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84983514117&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1039/c6sc00523c

DO - 10.1039/c6sc00523c

M3 - Article

C2 - 30034699

AN - SCOPUS:84983514117

VL - 7

SP - 5624

EP - 5634

JO - Chemical Science

JF - Chemical Science

SN - 2041-6520

IS - 9

ER -