Antecedents and consequences of perceived autonomy support in elite sport: a diary study linking coaches’ off-job recovery and athletes’ performance satisfaction

Yannick A. Balk (Corresponding author), Jan de Jonge, Sabine A.E. Geurts, Wido G.M. Oerlemans

Onderzoeksoutput: Bijdrage aan tijdschriftTijdschriftartikelAcademicpeer review

Uittreksel

Objectives: To prevent poor health and well-being resulting from the high demands of coaching in elite sport, coaches need to recover during time away from work. This can benefit coaches’ own work experiences as well as their interpersonal behaviour towards athletes. Therefore, the first aim of this study was to investigate within-person associations between elite coaches’ off-job recovery (i.e., physical, cognitive, and emotional detachment from work), physical fatigue, positive affect, work engagement, and perceived autonomy support. The second aim was to investigate within-person associations between elite athletes’ daily perceptions of autonomy support, athlete engagement, and performance satisfaction. Design: A one-week daily diary study was conducted. Method: Thirty-one elite coaches (30 males, 1 female)and 96 elite athletes (67 males, 29 females)completed online daily surveys across eight consecutive days. Results: Multilevel structural equation modelling showed that coaches’ daily off-job physical detachment was negatively related to physical fatigue the next morning, whereas daily off-job emotional detachment was positively related to positive affect the next morning. Physical fatigue and positive affect were positively and negatively related to daily work engagement, respectively, which in turn was positively related to athletes’ perceptions of autonomy support. For athletes, daily athlete engagement fully mediated the relation between daily perceived autonomy support and daily performance satisfaction. Conclusions: This study shows that off-job recovery, in terms of physical and emotional detachment from work, is not only important for elite coaches’ health, well-being, and work engagement but also benefits elite athletes’ daily sport experiences.

TaalEngels
Pagina's26-34
Aantal pagina's9
TijdschriftPsychology of Sport and Exercise
Volume44
DOI's
StatusGepubliceerd - 1 sep 2019

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Athletes
Sports
Fatigue
Mentoring
Health

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    Citeer dit

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    title = "Antecedents and consequences of perceived autonomy support in elite sport: a diary study linking coaches’ off-job recovery and athletes’ performance satisfaction",
    abstract = "Objectives: To prevent poor health and well-being resulting from the high demands of coaching in elite sport, coaches need to recover during time away from work. This can benefit coaches’ own work experiences as well as their interpersonal behaviour towards athletes. Therefore, the first aim of this study was to investigate within-person associations between elite coaches’ off-job recovery (i.e., physical, cognitive, and emotional detachment from work), physical fatigue, positive affect, work engagement, and perceived autonomy support. The second aim was to investigate within-person associations between elite athletes’ daily perceptions of autonomy support, athlete engagement, and performance satisfaction. Design: A one-week daily diary study was conducted. Method: Thirty-one elite coaches (30 males, 1 female)and 96 elite athletes (67 males, 29 females)completed online daily surveys across eight consecutive days. Results: Multilevel structural equation modelling showed that coaches’ daily off-job physical detachment was negatively related to physical fatigue the next morning, whereas daily off-job emotional detachment was positively related to positive affect the next morning. Physical fatigue and positive affect were positively and negatively related to daily work engagement, respectively, which in turn was positively related to athletes’ perceptions of autonomy support. For athletes, daily athlete engagement fully mediated the relation between daily perceived autonomy support and daily performance satisfaction. Conclusions: This study shows that off-job recovery, in terms of physical and emotional detachment from work, is not only important for elite coaches’ health, well-being, and work engagement but also benefits elite athletes’ daily sport experiences.",
    keywords = "Athlete engagement, Detachment, Fatigue, Multilevel modelling, Positive affect, Work engagement",
    author = "Balk, {Yannick A.} and {de Jonge}, Jan and Geurts, {Sabine A.E.} and Oerlemans, {Wido G.M.}",
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    Antecedents and consequences of perceived autonomy support in elite sport : a diary study linking coaches’ off-job recovery and athletes’ performance satisfaction. / Balk, Yannick A. (Corresponding author); de Jonge, Jan; Geurts, Sabine A.E.; Oerlemans, Wido G.M.

    In: Psychology of Sport and Exercise, Vol. 44, 01.09.2019, blz. 26-34.

    Onderzoeksoutput: Bijdrage aan tijdschriftTijdschriftartikelAcademicpeer review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Antecedents and consequences of perceived autonomy support in elite sport

    T2 - Psychology of Sport and Exercise

    AU - Balk,Yannick A.

    AU - de Jonge,Jan

    AU - Geurts,Sabine A.E.

    AU - Oerlemans,Wido G.M.

    PY - 2019/9/1

    Y1 - 2019/9/1

    N2 - Objectives: To prevent poor health and well-being resulting from the high demands of coaching in elite sport, coaches need to recover during time away from work. This can benefit coaches’ own work experiences as well as their interpersonal behaviour towards athletes. Therefore, the first aim of this study was to investigate within-person associations between elite coaches’ off-job recovery (i.e., physical, cognitive, and emotional detachment from work), physical fatigue, positive affect, work engagement, and perceived autonomy support. The second aim was to investigate within-person associations between elite athletes’ daily perceptions of autonomy support, athlete engagement, and performance satisfaction. Design: A one-week daily diary study was conducted. Method: Thirty-one elite coaches (30 males, 1 female)and 96 elite athletes (67 males, 29 females)completed online daily surveys across eight consecutive days. Results: Multilevel structural equation modelling showed that coaches’ daily off-job physical detachment was negatively related to physical fatigue the next morning, whereas daily off-job emotional detachment was positively related to positive affect the next morning. Physical fatigue and positive affect were positively and negatively related to daily work engagement, respectively, which in turn was positively related to athletes’ perceptions of autonomy support. For athletes, daily athlete engagement fully mediated the relation between daily perceived autonomy support and daily performance satisfaction. Conclusions: This study shows that off-job recovery, in terms of physical and emotional detachment from work, is not only important for elite coaches’ health, well-being, and work engagement but also benefits elite athletes’ daily sport experiences.

    AB - Objectives: To prevent poor health and well-being resulting from the high demands of coaching in elite sport, coaches need to recover during time away from work. This can benefit coaches’ own work experiences as well as their interpersonal behaviour towards athletes. Therefore, the first aim of this study was to investigate within-person associations between elite coaches’ off-job recovery (i.e., physical, cognitive, and emotional detachment from work), physical fatigue, positive affect, work engagement, and perceived autonomy support. The second aim was to investigate within-person associations between elite athletes’ daily perceptions of autonomy support, athlete engagement, and performance satisfaction. Design: A one-week daily diary study was conducted. Method: Thirty-one elite coaches (30 males, 1 female)and 96 elite athletes (67 males, 29 females)completed online daily surveys across eight consecutive days. Results: Multilevel structural equation modelling showed that coaches’ daily off-job physical detachment was negatively related to physical fatigue the next morning, whereas daily off-job emotional detachment was positively related to positive affect the next morning. Physical fatigue and positive affect were positively and negatively related to daily work engagement, respectively, which in turn was positively related to athletes’ perceptions of autonomy support. For athletes, daily athlete engagement fully mediated the relation between daily perceived autonomy support and daily performance satisfaction. Conclusions: This study shows that off-job recovery, in terms of physical and emotional detachment from work, is not only important for elite coaches’ health, well-being, and work engagement but also benefits elite athletes’ daily sport experiences.

    KW - Athlete engagement

    KW - Detachment

    KW - Fatigue

    KW - Multilevel modelling

    KW - Positive affect

    KW - Work engagement

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    DO - 10.1016/j.psychsport.2019.04.020

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    EP - 34

    JO - Psychology of Sport and Exercise

    JF - Psychology of Sport and Exercise

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