A five dimensional implementation of the flamelet generated manifolds technique for gas turbine application

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Proceedings of the International Conference on Numerical Analysis and Applied Mathematics 2014 (ICNAAM-2014), 22–28 September 2014 Location: Rhodes, Greece ISBN 978-0-7354-1287-3 In the present paper the Flamelet-Generated Manifold (FGM) chemistry reduction method is implemented and extended for the inclusion of all the features that are typically observed in stationary gas-turbine combustion. These consist of stratification effects, heat loss and turbulence. The latter is included by coupling FGM with the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes(RANS)model. Three control variables are included for the chemistry representation: the reaction evolution is described by the reaction progress variable, the heat loss is described by the enthalpy and the stratification effect is expressed by the mixture fraction. The interaction between chemistry and turbulence is considered through a presumed probability density function (PDF) approach, which is considered for progress variable and mixture fraction. This results in two extra control variables: progress variable variance and mixture fraction variance. The resulting manifold is five-dimensional, in which the dimensions are progress variable, enthalpy, mixture fraction, progress variable variance and mixture fraction variance. In addition, a highly turbulent and swirling flame in a gas turbine model combustor is computed, in order to test the 5-D FGM implementation. The use of FGM as a combustionmodel shows that combustion features at gas turbine conditions can be satisfactorily reproduced with a reasonable computational effort. The implemented combustionmodel retains most of the physical accuracy of a detailed simulation while drastically reducing its computational time, paving the way for new developments of alternative fuel usage in a cleaner and more efficient combustion. In the present paper the Flamelet-Generated Manifold (FGM) chemistry reduction method is implemented and extended for the inclusion of all the features that are typically observed in stationary gas-turbine combustion. These consist of stratification effects, heat loss and turbulence. The latter is included by coupling FGM with the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes(RANS)model. Three control variables are included for the chemistry representation: the reaction evolution is described by the reaction progress variable, the heat loss is described by the enthalpy and the stratification effect is expressed by the mixture fraction. The interaction between chemistry and turbulence is considered through a presumed probability density function (PDF) approach, which is considered for progress variable and mixture fraction. This results in two extra control variables: progress variable variance and mixture fraction variance. The resulting manifold is five-dimensional, in which the dimensions are progress variable, enthalpy, mixture fraction, progress variable variance and mixture fraction variance. In addition, a highly turbulent and swirling flame in a gas turbine model combustor is computed, in order to test the 5-D FGM implementation. The use of FGM as a combustionmodel shows that combustion features at gas turbine conditions can be satisfactorily reproduced with a reasonable computational effort. The implemented combustionmodel retains most of the physical accuracy of a detailed simulation while drastically reducing its computational time, paving the way for new developments of alternative fuel usage in a cleaner and more efficient combustion.
Originele taal-2Engels
Pagina's (van-tot)030012-1/5
Aantal pagina's5
TijdschriftAIP Conference Proceedings
Volume1648
DOI's
StatusGepubliceerd - 2015

Vingerafdruk

gas turbines
stratification
enthalpy
turbulence
chemistry
cleaners
swirling
turbulent flames
combustion chambers
probability density functions
analysis (mathematics)
temperature effects
flames
inclusions
heat
Greece
mathematics
numerical analysis
congressional reports

Citeer dit

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title = "A five dimensional implementation of the flamelet generated manifolds technique for gas turbine application",
abstract = "Proceedings of the International Conference on Numerical Analysis and Applied Mathematics 2014 (ICNAAM-2014), 22–28 September 2014 Location: Rhodes, Greece ISBN 978-0-7354-1287-3 In the present paper the Flamelet-Generated Manifold (FGM) chemistry reduction method is implemented and extended for the inclusion of all the features that are typically observed in stationary gas-turbine combustion. These consist of stratification effects, heat loss and turbulence. The latter is included by coupling FGM with the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes(RANS)model. Three control variables are included for the chemistry representation: the reaction evolution is described by the reaction progress variable, the heat loss is described by the enthalpy and the stratification effect is expressed by the mixture fraction. The interaction between chemistry and turbulence is considered through a presumed probability density function (PDF) approach, which is considered for progress variable and mixture fraction. This results in two extra control variables: progress variable variance and mixture fraction variance. The resulting manifold is five-dimensional, in which the dimensions are progress variable, enthalpy, mixture fraction, progress variable variance and mixture fraction variance. In addition, a highly turbulent and swirling flame in a gas turbine model combustor is computed, in order to test the 5-D FGM implementation. The use of FGM as a combustionmodel shows that combustion features at gas turbine conditions can be satisfactorily reproduced with a reasonable computational effort. The implemented combustionmodel retains most of the physical accuracy of a detailed simulation while drastically reducing its computational time, paving the way for new developments of alternative fuel usage in a cleaner and more efficient combustion. In the present paper the Flamelet-Generated Manifold (FGM) chemistry reduction method is implemented and extended for the inclusion of all the features that are typically observed in stationary gas-turbine combustion. These consist of stratification effects, heat loss and turbulence. The latter is included by coupling FGM with the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes(RANS)model. Three control variables are included for the chemistry representation: the reaction evolution is described by the reaction progress variable, the heat loss is described by the enthalpy and the stratification effect is expressed by the mixture fraction. The interaction between chemistry and turbulence is considered through a presumed probability density function (PDF) approach, which is considered for progress variable and mixture fraction. This results in two extra control variables: progress variable variance and mixture fraction variance. The resulting manifold is five-dimensional, in which the dimensions are progress variable, enthalpy, mixture fraction, progress variable variance and mixture fraction variance. In addition, a highly turbulent and swirling flame in a gas turbine model combustor is computed, in order to test the 5-D FGM implementation. The use of FGM as a combustionmodel shows that combustion features at gas turbine conditions can be satisfactorily reproduced with a reasonable computational effort. The implemented combustionmodel retains most of the physical accuracy of a detailed simulation while drastically reducing its computational time, paving the way for new developments of alternative fuel usage in a cleaner and more efficient combustion.",
author = "A. Donini and R.J.M. Bastiaans and {Oijen, van}, J.A. and {Goey, de}, L.P.H.",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1063/1.4912329",
language = "English",
volume = "1648",
pages = "030012--1/5",
journal = "AIP Conference Proceedings",
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publisher = "American Institute of Physics",

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A five dimensional implementation of the flamelet generated manifolds technique for gas turbine application. / Donini, A.; Bastiaans, R.J.M.; Oijen, van, J.A.; Goey, de, L.P.H.

In: AIP Conference Proceedings, Vol. 1648, 2015, blz. 030012-1/5.

Onderzoeksoutput: Bijdrage aan tijdschriftTijdschriftartikelAcademicpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - A five dimensional implementation of the flamelet generated manifolds technique for gas turbine application

AU - Donini, A.

AU - Bastiaans, R.J.M.

AU - Oijen, van, J.A.

AU - Goey, de, L.P.H.

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N2 - Proceedings of the International Conference on Numerical Analysis and Applied Mathematics 2014 (ICNAAM-2014), 22–28 September 2014 Location: Rhodes, Greece ISBN 978-0-7354-1287-3 In the present paper the Flamelet-Generated Manifold (FGM) chemistry reduction method is implemented and extended for the inclusion of all the features that are typically observed in stationary gas-turbine combustion. These consist of stratification effects, heat loss and turbulence. The latter is included by coupling FGM with the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes(RANS)model. Three control variables are included for the chemistry representation: the reaction evolution is described by the reaction progress variable, the heat loss is described by the enthalpy and the stratification effect is expressed by the mixture fraction. The interaction between chemistry and turbulence is considered through a presumed probability density function (PDF) approach, which is considered for progress variable and mixture fraction. This results in two extra control variables: progress variable variance and mixture fraction variance. The resulting manifold is five-dimensional, in which the dimensions are progress variable, enthalpy, mixture fraction, progress variable variance and mixture fraction variance. In addition, a highly turbulent and swirling flame in a gas turbine model combustor is computed, in order to test the 5-D FGM implementation. The use of FGM as a combustionmodel shows that combustion features at gas turbine conditions can be satisfactorily reproduced with a reasonable computational effort. The implemented combustionmodel retains most of the physical accuracy of a detailed simulation while drastically reducing its computational time, paving the way for new developments of alternative fuel usage in a cleaner and more efficient combustion. In the present paper the Flamelet-Generated Manifold (FGM) chemistry reduction method is implemented and extended for the inclusion of all the features that are typically observed in stationary gas-turbine combustion. These consist of stratification effects, heat loss and turbulence. The latter is included by coupling FGM with the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes(RANS)model. Three control variables are included for the chemistry representation: the reaction evolution is described by the reaction progress variable, the heat loss is described by the enthalpy and the stratification effect is expressed by the mixture fraction. The interaction between chemistry and turbulence is considered through a presumed probability density function (PDF) approach, which is considered for progress variable and mixture fraction. This results in two extra control variables: progress variable variance and mixture fraction variance. The resulting manifold is five-dimensional, in which the dimensions are progress variable, enthalpy, mixture fraction, progress variable variance and mixture fraction variance. In addition, a highly turbulent and swirling flame in a gas turbine model combustor is computed, in order to test the 5-D FGM implementation. The use of FGM as a combustionmodel shows that combustion features at gas turbine conditions can be satisfactorily reproduced with a reasonable computational effort. The implemented combustionmodel retains most of the physical accuracy of a detailed simulation while drastically reducing its computational time, paving the way for new developments of alternative fuel usage in a cleaner and more efficient combustion.

AB - Proceedings of the International Conference on Numerical Analysis and Applied Mathematics 2014 (ICNAAM-2014), 22–28 September 2014 Location: Rhodes, Greece ISBN 978-0-7354-1287-3 In the present paper the Flamelet-Generated Manifold (FGM) chemistry reduction method is implemented and extended for the inclusion of all the features that are typically observed in stationary gas-turbine combustion. These consist of stratification effects, heat loss and turbulence. The latter is included by coupling FGM with the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes(RANS)model. Three control variables are included for the chemistry representation: the reaction evolution is described by the reaction progress variable, the heat loss is described by the enthalpy and the stratification effect is expressed by the mixture fraction. The interaction between chemistry and turbulence is considered through a presumed probability density function (PDF) approach, which is considered for progress variable and mixture fraction. This results in two extra control variables: progress variable variance and mixture fraction variance. The resulting manifold is five-dimensional, in which the dimensions are progress variable, enthalpy, mixture fraction, progress variable variance and mixture fraction variance. In addition, a highly turbulent and swirling flame in a gas turbine model combustor is computed, in order to test the 5-D FGM implementation. The use of FGM as a combustionmodel shows that combustion features at gas turbine conditions can be satisfactorily reproduced with a reasonable computational effort. The implemented combustionmodel retains most of the physical accuracy of a detailed simulation while drastically reducing its computational time, paving the way for new developments of alternative fuel usage in a cleaner and more efficient combustion. In the present paper the Flamelet-Generated Manifold (FGM) chemistry reduction method is implemented and extended for the inclusion of all the features that are typically observed in stationary gas-turbine combustion. These consist of stratification effects, heat loss and turbulence. The latter is included by coupling FGM with the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes(RANS)model. Three control variables are included for the chemistry representation: the reaction evolution is described by the reaction progress variable, the heat loss is described by the enthalpy and the stratification effect is expressed by the mixture fraction. The interaction between chemistry and turbulence is considered through a presumed probability density function (PDF) approach, which is considered for progress variable and mixture fraction. This results in two extra control variables: progress variable variance and mixture fraction variance. The resulting manifold is five-dimensional, in which the dimensions are progress variable, enthalpy, mixture fraction, progress variable variance and mixture fraction variance. In addition, a highly turbulent and swirling flame in a gas turbine model combustor is computed, in order to test the 5-D FGM implementation. The use of FGM as a combustionmodel shows that combustion features at gas turbine conditions can be satisfactorily reproduced with a reasonable computational effort. The implemented combustionmodel retains most of the physical accuracy of a detailed simulation while drastically reducing its computational time, paving the way for new developments of alternative fuel usage in a cleaner and more efficient combustion.

U2 - 10.1063/1.4912329

DO - 10.1063/1.4912329

M3 - Article

VL - 1648

SP - 030012-1/5

JO - AIP Conference Proceedings

JF - AIP Conference Proceedings

SN - 0094-243X

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