Workflow patterns as a means to model task succession in games: a preliminary case study

Simone Kriglstein, Ross Brown, Günter Wallner

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Over the last decade, people involved in game development have noted the need for more formal models and tools to support the design phase of games. In this paper we present an initial investigation into whether workflow patterns – which have already proven to be effective for modeling business processes – are a suitable way to model task succession in games. Our preliminary results suggest that workflow patterns show promise in this regard, but some limitations, especially with regard to time constraints, currently restrict their potential.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternational Conference on Entertainment Computing
EditorsY. Pisan, N.M. Sgouros, T. Marsh
Place of PublicationBerlin
PublisherSpringer
Pages36-41
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-662-45212-7
ISBN (Print)978-3-662-45211-0
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes
Event13th International Conference on Entertainment Computing, ICEC 2014, October 1-3, 2014, Sydney, Australia - Sydney, Australia
Duration: 1 Oct 20143 Oct 2014
http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783662452110

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
PublisherSpringer
Volume8770
ISSN (Print)0302-9743

Conference

Conference13th International Conference on Entertainment Computing, ICEC 2014, October 1-3, 2014, Sydney, Australia
Abbreviated titleICEC 2014
CountryAustralia
CitySydney
Period1/10/143/10/14
Internet address

Keywords

  • Design Tools
  • Game Design
  • Workflow Patterns

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