Why is economic geography not an evolutionary science? : towards an evolutionary economic geography

R.A. Boschma, K. Frenken

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademic

Abstract

The paper explains the commonalities and differences between neoclassical, institutional and evolutionary approaches that have been influential in economic geography during the last couple of decades. By separating the three approaches in terms of theoretical content and research methodology, we can appreciate both the commonalities and differences between the three approaches. It is also apparent that innovative theorizing currently occurs at the interface between neoclassical and evolutionary theory (especially in modelling) and at the interface between institutional and evolutionary theory (especially in ‘appreciative theorizing’). Taken together, we argue that Evolutionary Economic Geography is an emerging paradigm in economic geography, yet does so without isolating itself from developments in other theoretical approaches.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEconomy : critical essays in human geography
EditorsR. Martin
Place of PublicationAldershot
PublisherAshgate
Pages127-156
Number of pages558
ISBN (Print)978-0-7546-2745-6
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Publication series

NameContemporary foundations of space and place

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    Boschma, R. A., & Frenken, K. (2008). Why is economic geography not an evolutionary science? : towards an evolutionary economic geography. In R. Martin (Ed.), Economy : critical essays in human geography (pp. 127-156). (Contemporary foundations of space and place). Ashgate.