Who is more likely to influence others? A value-based approach to pro-environmental social influence behavior (Preprint)

Andrea Kis, Mark Verschoor, Rebecca Sargisson

Research output: Working paperAcademic

Abstract

Biospheric values can promote, and egoistic values inhibit, a broad range of pro-environmental behaviors. However, people who strongly endorse egoistic values might undertake pro-environmental behavior involving attempts to influence others. We used a questionnaire to assess the relationship between values and the likelihood that with 193 students will attempt to influence their housemates to engage in pro-environmental behavior. To measure this type of influence behavior, we developed and used the Environmental Social Influence Behavior (E-SIB) questionnaire. Both biospheric and egoistic values promoted influence behaviors. Biospheric values more strongly predicted the likelihood of social-influence actions as egoistic values decreased, except when egoistic values were high. We discuss the connections between values and social-influence behaviors, and current knowledge on the role of egoistic values in environmental actions.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherPsyArXiv Preprints
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 18 Nov 2019

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Keywords

  • biospheric values
  • egoistic values
  • household energy conservation
  • pro-environmental behavior
  • social influence behavior

Cite this

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Who is more likely to influence others? A value-based approach to pro-environmental social influence behavior (Preprint). / Kis, Andrea; Verschoor, Mark; Sargisson, Rebecca.

PsyArXiv Preprints, 2019.

Research output: Working paperAcademic

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