When bicycle lanes are not enough: growing mode share in Cape Town, South Africa: an analysis of policy and practice

Gail Jennings, Brett Petzer, Ezra Goldman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of South Africa's national and local 'infrastructure-first' approach, and it argues that this narrow approach evident in Cape Town until recently may go some way to explaining the lack of significant mode shift in the city since the first walking and cycling policy. It considers the conditions beyond infrastructure that have given rise to a bicycle culture and increased mode share in cities elsewhere – Bogota and Copenhagen, in particular. The chapter provides the cautions to the cities wishing to learn from the Cape Town experience are advised to learn from the city's mistakes, too – as Cape Town itself is doing. The 2017 draft Cycle Strategy, as released for public comment in January 2017, offers little evidence of a change in direction – and its draft vision continues the narrative thread of claiming leadership in terms of bicycle planning.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationNon-motorized transport integration into urban transport planning in Africa
EditorsWinnie V. Mitullah, Marianne Vanderschuren, Meleckidzedeck Khayesi
Place of PublicationOxford
PublisherRoutledge Taylor & Francis Group
Chapter13
Pages206-223
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-315-59845-1
ISBN (Print)978-1-4724-1140-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Publication series

NameTransport and Society
PublisherRoutledge

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bicycle
town
infrastructure
leadership
narrative
planning
lack
evidence
experience

Cite this

Jennings, G., Petzer, B., & Goldman, E. (2017). When bicycle lanes are not enough: growing mode share in Cape Town, South Africa: an analysis of policy and practice. In W. V. Mitullah, M. Vanderschuren, & M. Khayesi (Eds.), Non-motorized transport integration into urban transport planning in Africa (pp. 206-223). (Transport and Society). Oxford: Routledge Taylor & Francis Group. DOI: 10.4324/9781315598451-13
Jennings, Gail ; Petzer, Brett ; Goldman, Ezra. / When bicycle lanes are not enough : growing mode share in Cape Town, South Africa: an analysis of policy and practice. Non-motorized transport integration into urban transport planning in Africa. editor / Winnie V. Mitullah ; Marianne Vanderschuren ; Meleckidzedeck Khayesi. Oxford : Routledge Taylor & Francis Group, 2017. pp. 206-223 (Transport and Society).
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Jennings, G, Petzer, B & Goldman, E 2017, When bicycle lanes are not enough: growing mode share in Cape Town, South Africa: an analysis of policy and practice. in WV Mitullah, M Vanderschuren & M Khayesi (eds), Non-motorized transport integration into urban transport planning in Africa. Transport and Society, Routledge Taylor & Francis Group, Oxford, pp. 206-223. DOI: 10.4324/9781315598451-13

When bicycle lanes are not enough : growing mode share in Cape Town, South Africa: an analysis of policy and practice. / Jennings, Gail; Petzer, Brett; Goldman, Ezra.

Non-motorized transport integration into urban transport planning in Africa. ed. / Winnie V. Mitullah; Marianne Vanderschuren; Meleckidzedeck Khayesi. Oxford : Routledge Taylor & Francis Group, 2017. p. 206-223 (Transport and Society).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

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Jennings G, Petzer B, Goldman E. When bicycle lanes are not enough: growing mode share in Cape Town, South Africa: an analysis of policy and practice. In Mitullah WV, Vanderschuren M, Khayesi M, editors, Non-motorized transport integration into urban transport planning in Africa. Oxford: Routledge Taylor & Francis Group. 2017. p. 206-223. (Transport and Society). Available from, DOI: 10.4324/9781315598451-13