What matters for ritual visualization: towards a design tool for the description and the composition of rituals

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Abstract

Our lives are highly shaped by rituals. The way we wake up, the way we prepare tea or coffee are two of the many rituals many of us have constructed. As they structure our everyday lives, it is crucial to understand how to design them from a kansei design perspective. This Research-through-Design inquiry contributes to a larger research of addressing the way to design rituals. An annotated showcase of three ritual design projects is proposed. From the analysis of these three projects, we suggest 11 points of attention for the construction of a ritual visualization tool. This tool is expected to be used not only to support the analysis and the assessment of rituals, but also to contribute to the composition of rituals, towards the design of experientially rich rituals from an interaction perspective.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication6th International Kansei Engineering and Emotion Research Conference, KEER 2016, University of Leeds, August 31 - September 2, 2016
PublisherJapan Society of Kansei Engineering
Number of pages14
Publication statusPublished - 2 Sep 2016
Event6th International Conference on Kansei Engineering and Emotion Research (KEER 2016) - University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom
Duration: 31 Aug 20162 Sep 2016
Conference number: 6
http://www.keer2016.co.uk/

Conference

Conference6th International Conference on Kansei Engineering and Emotion Research (KEER 2016)
Abbreviated titleKEER 2016
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLeeds
Period31/08/162/09/16
Internet address

Keywords

  • ritual
  • visualization tool
  • interaction design
  • research-through-design
  • annotated portfolio

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    Lévy, P., & Hengeveld, B. (2016). What matters for ritual visualization: towards a design tool for the description and the composition of rituals. In 6th International Kansei Engineering and Emotion Research Conference, KEER 2016, University of Leeds, August 31 - September 2, 2016 Japan Society of Kansei Engineering.