What makes social feedback from a robot work? Disentangling the effect of speech, physical appearance and evaluation

Suzanne Vossen, Jaap Ham, Cees Midden

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous research showed that energy consumption feedback of a social nature resulted in less energy consumption than factual energy consumption feedback. However, it was not clear which elements of social feedback (i.e. evaluation of behavior, the use of speech or the social appearance of the feedback source) caused this higher persuasiveness. In a first experiment we studied the role of evaluation by comparing the energy consumption of participants who received factual, evaluative or social feedback while using a virtual washing machine. The results suggested that social evaluative feedback resulted in lower energy consumption than both factual and evaluative feedback. In the second experiment we examined the role of speech and physical appearance in enhancing the persuasiveness of evaluative feedback. Overall, the current research suggests that the addition of only one social cue is sufficient to enhance the persuasiveness of evaluative feedback, while combining both cues will not further enhance persuasiveness.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPersuasive Technology - 5th International Conference, PERSUASIVE 2010, Proceedings
Pages52-57
Number of pages6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Jul 2010
Event5th International Conference on Persuasive Technology, PERSUASIVE 2010 - Copenhagen, Denmark
Duration: 7 Jun 201010 Jun 2010
Conference number: 5

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume6137 LNCS
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

Conference5th International Conference on Persuasive Technology, PERSUASIVE 2010
Abbreviated titlePERSUASIVE 2010
CountryDenmark
CityCopenhagen
Period7/06/1010/06/10

Fingerprint

Robot
Robots
Feedback
Evaluation
Energy Consumption
Energy utilization
Washing machines
Speech
Virtual Machine
Experiment
Experiments
Sufficient

Keywords

  • energy conservation
  • evaluation
  • social cues
  • social feedback

Cite this

Vossen, S., Ham, J., & Midden, C. (2010). What makes social feedback from a robot work? Disentangling the effect of speech, physical appearance and evaluation. In Persuasive Technology - 5th International Conference, PERSUASIVE 2010, Proceedings (pp. 52-57). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 6137 LNCS). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-13226-1_7
Vossen, Suzanne ; Ham, Jaap ; Midden, Cees. / What makes social feedback from a robot work? Disentangling the effect of speech, physical appearance and evaluation. Persuasive Technology - 5th International Conference, PERSUASIVE 2010, Proceedings. 2010. pp. 52-57 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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Vossen, S, Ham, J & Midden, C 2010, What makes social feedback from a robot work? Disentangling the effect of speech, physical appearance and evaluation. in Persuasive Technology - 5th International Conference, PERSUASIVE 2010, Proceedings. Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 6137 LNCS, pp. 52-57, 5th International Conference on Persuasive Technology, PERSUASIVE 2010, Copenhagen, Denmark, 7/06/10. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-13226-1_7

What makes social feedback from a robot work? Disentangling the effect of speech, physical appearance and evaluation. / Vossen, Suzanne; Ham, Jaap; Midden, Cees.

Persuasive Technology - 5th International Conference, PERSUASIVE 2010, Proceedings. 2010. p. 52-57 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 6137 LNCS).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

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Vossen S, Ham J, Midden C. What makes social feedback from a robot work? Disentangling the effect of speech, physical appearance and evaluation. In Persuasive Technology - 5th International Conference, PERSUASIVE 2010, Proceedings. 2010. p. 52-57. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-13226-1_7