Water layer thickness evaluation in autoclaved aerated aoncrete slurries

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Abstract

A slurry is often described as solid material particles that are surrounded by a water film and with additional water within the voids that decreases the shear forces between the particles. In cement and concrete research the water amount is an important parameter. There needs to be enough water to create a proper slurry, and afterwards it is consumed by the hydration of the hydraulic phases. To distinguish between a moist powder and a slurry, the point where all particles are wetted, but no remaining water is filling the pores is defined. The thickness of the water layer can be determined by different methods and is already measured for various materials. In this research it is tried to apply the method not just to a single material, but to an AAC mixture of six different materials. The obtained values are compared with the ones known from pastes and mortars.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Cement and Concrete Technology in Africa
Subtitle of host publication2nd International Conference
EditorsWolfram Schmidt, Nsesheye Susan Msinjili
PublisherBAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing
Pages343-350
Number of pages8
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2016
Event2nd International Conference on Advances in Cement and Concrete Technology in Africa (ACCTA 2016), January 27-29, 2016, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania - White Sands Hotel, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, United Republic of
Duration: 27 Jan 201629 Jan 2016
http://www.accta2016.bam.de/en/home/index.htm

Conference

Conference2nd International Conference on Advances in Cement and Concrete Technology in Africa (ACCTA 2016), January 27-29, 2016, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Abbreviated titleACCTA 2016
CountryTanzania, United Republic of
CityDar es Salaam
Period27/01/1629/01/16
Internet address

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