Towards model-based analysis of cardiac MR tagging data: relation between left ventricular shear strain and myofiber orientation

S.W.J. Ubbink, P.H.M. Bovendeerd, T. Delhaas, M.G.J. Arts, F.N. Vosse, van de

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Abstract

Many cardiac pathologies are reflected in abnormal myocardial deformation, accessible through magnetic resonance tagging (MRT). Interpretation of the MRT data is difficult, since the relation between pathology and deformation is not straightforward. Mathematical models of cardiac mechanics could be used to translate measured abnormalities into the underlying pathology, but, so far, they even fail to correctly simulate myocardial deformation in the healthy heart. In this study we investigated to what extent (1) our previously published three-dimensional finite element model of cardiac mechanics [Kerckhoffs, R.C.P., Bovendeerd, P.H.M., Kotte, J.C.S., Prinzen, F.W., Smits, K., Arts, T., 2003. Homogeneity of cardiac contraction despite physiological asynchrony of depolarization: a model study. Ann. Biomed. Eng. 31, 536–547] can simulate measured cardiac deformation, and (2) discrepancies between strains in model and experiment are related to the choice of the myofiber orientation in the model. To this end, we measured midwall circumferential strain Ecc and circumferential-radial shear strain Ecr in three healthy subjects using MRT. Ecc as computed in the model agreed well with measured Ecc. Computed Ecr differed significantly from measured Ecr. The time course of Ecr was found to be very sensitive to the choice of the myofiber orientation, in particular to the choice of the transverse angle. Discrepancies between circumferential-radial shear strain in model and experiment were reduced strongly by increasing the transverse angle in the original model by 25%.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)632-641
JournalMedical Image Analysis
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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Shear strain
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Pathology
Mechanics
Magnetic resonance
Art
Healthy Volunteers
Theoretical Models
Depolarization
Experiments
Mathematical models

Cite this

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title = "Towards model-based analysis of cardiac MR tagging data: relation between left ventricular shear strain and myofiber orientation",
abstract = "Many cardiac pathologies are reflected in abnormal myocardial deformation, accessible through magnetic resonance tagging (MRT). Interpretation of the MRT data is difficult, since the relation between pathology and deformation is not straightforward. Mathematical models of cardiac mechanics could be used to translate measured abnormalities into the underlying pathology, but, so far, they even fail to correctly simulate myocardial deformation in the healthy heart. In this study we investigated to what extent (1) our previously published three-dimensional finite element model of cardiac mechanics [Kerckhoffs, R.C.P., Bovendeerd, P.H.M., Kotte, J.C.S., Prinzen, F.W., Smits, K., Arts, T., 2003. Homogeneity of cardiac contraction despite physiological asynchrony of depolarization: a model study. Ann. Biomed. Eng. 31, 536–547] can simulate measured cardiac deformation, and (2) discrepancies between strains in model and experiment are related to the choice of the myofiber orientation in the model. To this end, we measured midwall circumferential strain Ecc and circumferential-radial shear strain Ecr in three healthy subjects using MRT. Ecc as computed in the model agreed well with measured Ecc. Computed Ecr differed significantly from measured Ecr. The time course of Ecr was found to be very sensitive to the choice of the myofiber orientation, in particular to the choice of the transverse angle. Discrepancies between circumferential-radial shear strain in model and experiment were reduced strongly by increasing the transverse angle in the original model by 25{\%}.",
author = "S.W.J. Ubbink and P.H.M. Bovendeerd and T. Delhaas and M.G.J. Arts and {Vosse, van de}, F.N.",
year = "2006",
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Towards model-based analysis of cardiac MR tagging data: relation between left ventricular shear strain and myofiber orientation. / Ubbink, S.W.J.; Bovendeerd, P.H.M.; Delhaas, T.; Arts, M.G.J.; Vosse, van de, F.N.

In: Medical Image Analysis, Vol. 10, No. 4, 2006, p. 632-641.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Towards model-based analysis of cardiac MR tagging data: relation between left ventricular shear strain and myofiber orientation

AU - Ubbink, S.W.J.

AU - Bovendeerd, P.H.M.

AU - Delhaas, T.

AU - Arts, M.G.J.

AU - Vosse, van de, F.N.

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - Many cardiac pathologies are reflected in abnormal myocardial deformation, accessible through magnetic resonance tagging (MRT). Interpretation of the MRT data is difficult, since the relation between pathology and deformation is not straightforward. Mathematical models of cardiac mechanics could be used to translate measured abnormalities into the underlying pathology, but, so far, they even fail to correctly simulate myocardial deformation in the healthy heart. In this study we investigated to what extent (1) our previously published three-dimensional finite element model of cardiac mechanics [Kerckhoffs, R.C.P., Bovendeerd, P.H.M., Kotte, J.C.S., Prinzen, F.W., Smits, K., Arts, T., 2003. Homogeneity of cardiac contraction despite physiological asynchrony of depolarization: a model study. Ann. Biomed. Eng. 31, 536–547] can simulate measured cardiac deformation, and (2) discrepancies between strains in model and experiment are related to the choice of the myofiber orientation in the model. To this end, we measured midwall circumferential strain Ecc and circumferential-radial shear strain Ecr in three healthy subjects using MRT. Ecc as computed in the model agreed well with measured Ecc. Computed Ecr differed significantly from measured Ecr. The time course of Ecr was found to be very sensitive to the choice of the myofiber orientation, in particular to the choice of the transverse angle. Discrepancies between circumferential-radial shear strain in model and experiment were reduced strongly by increasing the transverse angle in the original model by 25%.

AB - Many cardiac pathologies are reflected in abnormal myocardial deformation, accessible through magnetic resonance tagging (MRT). Interpretation of the MRT data is difficult, since the relation between pathology and deformation is not straightforward. Mathematical models of cardiac mechanics could be used to translate measured abnormalities into the underlying pathology, but, so far, they even fail to correctly simulate myocardial deformation in the healthy heart. In this study we investigated to what extent (1) our previously published three-dimensional finite element model of cardiac mechanics [Kerckhoffs, R.C.P., Bovendeerd, P.H.M., Kotte, J.C.S., Prinzen, F.W., Smits, K., Arts, T., 2003. Homogeneity of cardiac contraction despite physiological asynchrony of depolarization: a model study. Ann. Biomed. Eng. 31, 536–547] can simulate measured cardiac deformation, and (2) discrepancies between strains in model and experiment are related to the choice of the myofiber orientation in the model. To this end, we measured midwall circumferential strain Ecc and circumferential-radial shear strain Ecr in three healthy subjects using MRT. Ecc as computed in the model agreed well with measured Ecc. Computed Ecr differed significantly from measured Ecr. The time course of Ecr was found to be very sensitive to the choice of the myofiber orientation, in particular to the choice of the transverse angle. Discrepancies between circumferential-radial shear strain in model and experiment were reduced strongly by increasing the transverse angle in the original model by 25%.

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JO - Medical Image Analysis

JF - Medical Image Analysis

SN - 1361-8415

IS - 4

ER -