The use of workload information to control job lateness in controlled and uncontrolled release production systems

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Abstract

The performance of a workload dependent scheduling and due date assignment rule is investigated. The rule uses time-phased workload information and time-phased capacity information. Performance comparisons are made with a rule that uses only time-aggregated workload information. The performance for two methods of releasing jobs to the shop is investigated: an uncontrolled method where the jobs are released at random, and a controlled method where jobs are released to maintain a specific workload norm. Computer simulation is used as the research tool. The mean and standard deviation of lateness are used as performance measures. The results indicate that the use of time-phased workload information may decrease the variance of the lateness, as compared with the use of time-aggregated workload information only. However, the magnitude of the effect depends on the type of sequencing rule used. Furthermore, if time-phased information is used, control of the mean lateness requires that the amount of capacity available for loading used in the loading procedure differs from the amount of capacity actually available for production. It is shown that by selecting adequate parameter values, both a constant mean lateness and a small variance of lateness can be obtained with this type of assignment rule. These results are valid for both types of release situations. So even in the case where the workload of the shop is under strict control, and the mean operation flow time does not, therefore, vary, the use of time-phased workload information can decrease the variance of the lateness.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-92
JournalJournal of Operations Management
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1983

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