The interpersonal dimension in the classroom : a model of teachers' interpersonal role identity, appraisal and teacher-student relationships

P.J. Brok, den, A.C. Want, van der, D. Beijaard, Th. Wubbels

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

    6 Citations (Scopus)
    668 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    In this chapter, a model to understand teachers’ emotions and behaviors in the classroom in relation to their professional identity will be presented and illustrated with empirical data. In the model it is argued that two types of teacher emotions, in this case associated with the domain of teacher-student interpersonal relationships, can emerge. One type of emotions are the result of teachers’ interpretations of and coping with specific classroom events, whereby their emotions are part of the appraisal process of situations, that are evaluated in the light of their interpersonal role identity standards. The second type of emotions emerge as a result of tensions or dilemmas that appear within or between different interpersonal role identity standards and are often based on series of classroom situations and events. It is argued that the model is helpful for both researchers and practitioners to better understand, recognize and support beginning (and experienced) teachers with emotions that occur in the classroom, and to help stimulate both their personal as well as professional development.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationEmotion in school : understanding how the hidden curriculum influences relationships, leadership, teaching, and learning
    EditorsA. Gallant, M. Newberry, P. Riley
    Place of PublicationBingley, UK
    PublisherEmerald Group Publishing Ltd.
    Pages141-162
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

    Publication series

    NameAdvances in Research in Education
    Volume18

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'The interpersonal dimension in the classroom : a model of teachers' interpersonal role identity, appraisal and teacher-student relationships'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this