The impact of the street-scale built environment on pedestrian metro station access/egress route choice

Yanan Liu (Corresponding author), Dujuan Yang, Harry J.P. Timmermans, Bauke de Vries

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding the relationship between micro-scale built environment and pedestrian trips from/to metro stations is important to stimulate walking as the key egress/access mode. This study developed a path size correction latent class logit model using 515 observed route trajectories between a metro station and an origin/destination near the metro station in Tianjin, China. Results suggest that pedestrians can be classified into two latent classes. Pedestrians in both classes prefer routes with a fence and lower floor area ratio. Except for the common significant results in the two classes, pedestrians who work in the area in class 1 attach a higher utility to shorter routes, lower width of the sidewalks, less street greenery, less traffic lights number, and smaller width of the road. Pedestrians who do not work in the area in class 2 attach a higher utility to longer routes, higher building lot coverage, and larger width of the road.
Original languageEnglish
Article number102491
Number of pages9
JournalTransportation Research. Part D: Transport and Environment
Volume87
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2020

Funding

The authors wish to acknowledge the valuable help and support from Dr. Jie He, Tianjin University; data collection effort of Yu Wang and the student members in the Spatial Humanities and Place Computation Laboratory (SHAPC Lab) and School of Architecture in Tianjin University. Yanan Liu holds a scholarship from the China Scholarship Council.

FundersFunder number
School of Architecture in Tianjin University
Tianjin University
China Scholarship Council

    Keywords

    • Latent class model
    • Path size correction logit model
    • Pedestrian
    • Route choice
    • Street-scale built environment

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'The impact of the street-scale built environment on pedestrian metro station access/egress route choice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this