The effect of in-line infusion filtering on in-line pressure monitoring in an experimental infusion system for newborns

Tinneke Jonckers, Ingrid Berger, Twan Kuijten, Eduard Meijer, Peter Andriessen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To study the effect of in-line filtering on in-line pressure measurement in a simulated infusion system. Methods: The experimental setup consisted of a syringe pump, syringe, intravenous (IV) line, and extension line. For aqueous fluids, a 0.2-μm infusion filter was used, and for lipid emulsions, a 1.2-μm filter. Infusion speed varied from 0.5 to 10.0 mL/h. First, the effect of clamping the extension line was studied on reaching alarm threshold. Second, the effect of aqueous and lipid fluids was evaluated on in-line pressure measurements. Results: In-line placement of an infusion filter did not prolong the time to alarm threshold after occlusion. During 24 hours of monitoring, lipid emulsions and all-in-one admixture only caused a moderate increase in in-line pressure. Conclusion: Placement of an infusion filter does not have a significant effect on the in-line pressure monitoring and has no adverse effect on detecting pressure-related complications of IV administration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)133-137
Number of pages5
JournalNeonatal Network
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 May 2014

Keywords

  • Clinical Alarms
  • Equipment Design
  • Equipment Failure
  • Fat Emulsions, Intravenous
  • Filtration/instrumentation
  • Fluid Therapy/instrumentation
  • Humans
  • Hydrostatic Pressure
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Infusion Pumps
  • Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
  • Parenteral Nutrition, Total/instrumentation
  • Transducers, Pressure

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