The crux of maximum hyperemia: the last remaining barrier for routine use of fractional flow reserve

Nico H.J. Pijls, Pim A.L. Tonino

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/Letter to the editorAcademicpeer-review

48 Citations (Scopus)
57 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In the decision-making process of revascularization of coronary artery stenoses by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), the presence and extent of reversible ischemia associated with such particular stenoses is of paramount importance (1, 2, 3). A stenosis associated with reversible ischemia (also called functionally significant or hemodynamically significant stenosis) causes symptoms of angina pectoris and has a negative influence on outcome (1, 2). Therefore, the general feeling is that such lesions should be revascularized if technically feasible. On the contrary, functionally nonsignificant stenoses do not cause symptoms by definition and have an excellent outcome with medical therapy (3, 4, 5). Therefore, revascularization of such lesions is generally not indicated.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1093-1095
Number of pages3
JournalJACC: Cardiovascular Interventions
Volume4
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2011

Keywords

  • adenosine
  • fractional flow reserve
  • maximum hyperemia
  • regadenoson

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