The Bollard - The lessons learned from from an unusual example of off-site construction

G.J. Maas, A.L.M. Eekelen, van

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

In 2001, a remarkable building was constructed and transported over water. It was a 42.5-m-high building with a circular cross-section of 30 m and a weight of 25,000 kN. It was built in an industrial plant, transported 25 km across water, and subsequently put ashore and placed on its foundation. Research aim: To identify the differences compared to traditional construction and to research whether these differences can be used to improve traditional methods of construction. Research issues are: The specific conditions under which the Bollard could become feasible and the key success factors for implementing this method of construction. Results: Many advantages are related to the alternative construction process provided that a design and the available infrastructure are suited for off-site production and transport. Although the building system is limited in terms of size and shape of the building, further advantages of ‘building with components’ includes disruption-free building with shorter interfaces and a blurring of the distinction between structural work and finishing work. Agreements pertaining to separate construction components have to be made during the construction process. Who is to determine the functional, the material and the process-oriented quality of a construction component? The construction method of the Bollard is further developed on two other projects: Amsterdam Schiphol Airport and the Rotterdam University Hospital EMCR. Recommendations are: The need for a sense of urgency, powerful management, flexibility in solutions, collaborative design, risk acceptance and process management.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)37-51
Number of pages15
JournalAutomation in Construction
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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