Stressors, resources, and strain at work : a longitudinal test of the Triple Match Principle

J. Jonge, de, C. Dormann

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298 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Abstract [Correction Notice: An erratum for this article was reported in Vol 92(1) of Journal of Applied Psychology (see record 2006-23339-016). The issue number at the upper left corner of the title page (p. 1359) is wrongly stated as 5 rather than 6. Furthermore, in Table 1 (p. 1362), the value in Column 12, Row 4 (Emo resources) should be -.07 rather than -0.7.] Two longitudinal studies investigated the issue of match between job stressors and job resources in the prediction of job-related strain. On the basis of the triple-match principle (TMP), it was hypothesized that resources are most likely to moderate the relation between stressors and strains if resources, stressors, and strains all match. Resources are less likely to moderate the relation between stressors and strains if (a) only resources and stressors match, (b) only resources and strains match, or (c) only stressors and strains match. Resources are least likely to moderate the relation between stressors and strains if there is no match among stressors, resources, and strains. The TMP was tested among 280 and 267 health care workers in 2 longitudinal surveys. The likelihood of finding moderating effects was linearly related to the degree of match, with 33.3% of all tested interactions becoming significant when there was a triple match, 16.7% when there was a double match, and 0.0% when there was no match. Findings were most consistent if there was an emotional match or a physical match. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1359-1374
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume91
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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