Spontaneous emission rates inside an omni-directional mirror

C.L.A. Hooijer, D. Lenstra, A. Lagendijk

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Summary form only given. The omnidirectional mirror (ODM), which offers metallic-like reflection properties with much lower losses, was first reported in 1998 by Joannopoulos and coworkers and attracted a lot of attention. The omnidirectional reflection is due to a band of frequencies for which no propagation into the mirror is possible for any angle of incidence. The ODM is a special example of a Bragg mirror; it consists of alternating high and low index layers with almost equal optical thickness grown such that the dielectric contrast changes periodically on the scale of an optical wavelength. ODMs are often referred to as photonic band gap materials, because there is a range of frequencies for which no propagation is possible.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationConference digest / 2000 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe (CLEO 2000) , 10 - 15 Septembre 2000, Nice, France
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
Pages324-324
ISBN (Print)0-7803-6319-1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000
Event2000 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Europe (CLEO®/Europe 2000) - Nice, France
Duration: 10 Sep 200015 Sep 2000

Conference

Conference2000 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Europe (CLEO®/Europe 2000)
Abbreviated titleCLEO®/Europe 2000
CountryFrance
CityNice
Period10/09/0015/09/00

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