Self-healing biomaterials: from molecular concepts to clinical applications

Mani Diba, Sergio Spaans, Ke Ning, Bastiaan D. Ippel, Fang Yang, Bas Loomans, Patricia Y.W. Dankers, Sander C.G. Leeuwenburgh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Biomaterials are being applied in increasingly complex areas such as tissue engineering, bioprinting, and regenerative medicine. For these applications, challenging-or even contradictory-combinations of biomaterial properties are often required which cannot be met by conventional biomaterials. During the past decade, several new concepts have been developed to render biomaterials self-healing, thereby offering new opportunities to improve the functionality of traditional biomaterials in terms of their mechanical, handling, and biological properties. Consequently, various types of self-healing polymeric, ceramic, or composite biomaterials have been developed. Nevertheless, despite the rapid emergence of the field of self-healing biomaterials, this field of research has not been reviewed during the recent years. Therefore, this article provides a critical overview of recent progress in the field of self-healing biomaterials research by discussing both extrinsic and intrinsic self-healing systems. While the extrinsic self-healing section focuses on self-healing dental materials and orthopedic bone cements that rely on release of healing liquids from embedded microcapsules, the section on intrinsic self-healing materials mainly discusses concepts for self-healing of polymeric biomaterials that are either hydrated (hydrogels) or nonhydrated (e.g., films and coatings). Finally, benefits of the self-healing feature for biomaterials are discussed, and directions for future research and developments are outlined.

LanguageEnglish
Article number1800118
Number of pages21
JournalAdvanced Materials Interfaces
Volume5
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - 7 Sep 2018

Fingerprint

Biomaterials
Self-healing materials
Dental materials
Bone cement
Orthopedics
Tissue engineering
Hydrogels
Coatings
Composite materials
Liquids

Keywords

  • Biomaterials
  • Extrinsic
  • Intrinsic
  • Self-healing
  • Self-repair

Cite this

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Self-healing biomaterials : from molecular concepts to clinical applications. / Diba, Mani; Spaans, Sergio; Ning, Ke; Ippel, Bastiaan D.; Yang, Fang; Loomans, Bas; Dankers, Patricia Y.W.; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C.G.

In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, Vol. 5, No. 17, 1800118, 07.09.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Spaans,Sergio

AU - Ning,Ke

AU - Ippel,Bastiaan D.

AU - Yang,Fang

AU - Loomans,Bas

AU - Dankers,Patricia Y.W.

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