Self-assembly and stabilization of hybrid cowpea chlorotic mottle virus particles under nearly physiological conditions

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Abstract

Capsids of the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) hold great promise for use as nanocarriers in vivo. A major drawback, however, is the lack of stability of the empty wild-type virus particles under physiological conditions. Herein, the assembly behavior and stability under nearly physiological conditions of protein-based block copolymers composed of the CCMV capsid protein and two hydrophobic elastin-like polypeptides are reported. UV/Vis spectroscopy studies, dynamic light-scattering analysis, and TEM measurements demonstrate that both hybrid variants form stable capsids at pH 7.5, physiological NaCl concentration, and 37 °C. The more hydrophobic variant also remains stable in a cell culture medium. These engineered, hybrid CCMV capsid particles can therefore be regarded as suitable candidates for in vivo applications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3518-3525
Number of pages8
JournalChemistry - An Asian Journal
Volume13
Issue number22
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Nov 2018

Keywords

  • drug delivery
  • nanoparticles
  • polypeptides
  • self-assembly
  • virus-like particles
  • Microscopy, Electron, Transmission
  • Temperature
  • Recombinant Proteins/biosynthesis
  • Virion/physiology
  • Virus Assembly/physiology
  • Capsid Proteins/chemistry
  • Mutagenesis
  • Spectrophotometry
  • Dynamic Light Scattering
  • Bromovirus/metabolism
  • Hydrogen-Ion Concentration

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