Safety oversight over disputed airspace

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Daedalus was an engineer who was imprisoned by King Minos in the Labyrinth in Crete. With his son, Icarus, he made wings of wax and feathers to escape by air as Minos controlled the sea around Crete. He gave instructions to Icarus: “With these wings you will fly like a bird, but be careful. Make sure you do not fly too close to the Sun, or the wax that holds the feathers together will melt and not too low or the spray from the sea will weigh down your wings.” Daedalus flew successfully from Crete to Naples, but Icarus ignored his father’s instructions and flew too high. The wings of wax melted and Icarus fell to his death in the ocean. Daedalus’ flight long has stood as a symbol of safety, success and progress in flight.
Greek Myth of Icarus and Deadalus Apollodorus, Epitome, I, 11-13
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)11-24
Number of pages14
JournalAviation and Space Journal
VolumeXIV
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Crete
Wax
Safety
Flight
Symbol
Birds
Naples
Engineers
Labyrinth
Controlled
Epitome
Ocean
Air
Sun
Greek Myth
Spray

Cite this

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Safety oversight over disputed airspace. / Antoni, N.

In: Aviation and Space Journal, Vol. XIV, No. 3, 07.2015, p. 11-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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