Rotational Particle Separator: an efficient method to separate micron-sized droplets and particles

J.J.H. Brouwers, H.P. Kemenade, van

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    Abstract

    The core of the rotational particle separator (RPS) is a rotating cylinder consisting of a multitude of axially oriented channels. Micron-sized particles entrained in the fluid flowing through the channels are centrifugated towards the walls of the channels. Here they form a layer or film of particles material which is removed by applying pressure pulses or by the flowing liquid itself. Housing, inlet/outlet configuration and means for rotation complete the design. Compared to conventional cyclones the RPS is an order of magnitude smaller in size at equal separation performance, while at equal size it separates particles ten times smaller. Applications of the RPS considered are: ash removal from hot flue gases in small scale combustion installations, product recovery in stainless environment for pharma/food, oil water separation and gas drying. Recent designs, results of experimental work and a desk-top demonstration version are presented.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationAFS 2011 Annual Conference
    Place of PublicationLouisville
    PublisherAmerican Filtration and Separations Society
    Publication statusPublished - 2011
    Eventconference; AFS 2011 Annual Conference; 2011-05-09; 2011-05-12 -
    Duration: 9 May 201112 May 2011

    Conference

    Conferenceconference; AFS 2011 Annual Conference; 2011-05-09; 2011-05-12
    Period9/05/1112/05/11
    OtherAFS 2011 Annual Conference

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  • Cite this

    Brouwers, J. J. H., & Kemenade, van, H. P. (2011). Rotational Particle Separator: an efficient method to separate micron-sized droplets and particles. In AFS 2011 Annual Conference American Filtration and Separations Society.