Review on Additive Manufacturing of Catalysts and Sorbents and the Potential for Process Intensification

Leon R.S. Rosseau, Vesna Middelkoop, Hans A.M. Willemsen, Ivo Roghair, Martin van Sint Annaland (Corresponding author)

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Abstract

Additive manufacturing of catalyst and sorbent materials promises to unlock large design freedom in the structuring of these materials, and could be used to locally tune porosity, shape and resulting parameters throughout the reactor along both the axial and transverse coordinates. This contrasts catalyst structuring by conventional methods, which yields either very dense randomly packed beds or very open cellular structures. Different 3D-printing processes for catalytic and sorbent materials exist, and the selection of an appropriate process, taking into account compatible materials, porosity and resolution, may indeed enable unbounded options for geometries. In this review, recent efforts in the field of 3D-printing of catalyst and sorbent materials are discussed. It will be argued that these efforts, whilst promising, do not yet exploit the full potential of the technology, since most studies considered small structures that are very similar to structures that can be produced through conventional methods. In addition, these studies are mostly motivated by chemical and material considerations within the printing process, without explicitly striving for process intensification. To enable value-added application of 3D-printing in the chemical process industries, three crucial requirements for increased process intensification potential will be set out: i) the production of mechanically stable structures without binders; ii) the introduction of local variations throughout the structure; and iii) the use of multiple materials within one printed structure.

Original languageEnglish
Article number834547
Number of pages25
JournalFrontiers in Chemical Engineering
Volume4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Feb 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © 2022 Rosseau, Middelkoop, Willemsen, Roghair and van Sint Annaland.

Funding

This article is based on research undertaken in relation to a project (ZEOCAT-3D) which has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme, under grant agreement No 814548. The authors would like to thank the EU Horizon 2020 programme for this opportunity. This publication only reflects the author’s views and neither the funding Agency nor the European Commission are responsible for any use that may be made of the information contained therein. This article is based on research undertaken in relation to a project (ZEOCAT-3D) which has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme, under grant agreement No 814548. The authors would like to thank the EU Horizon 2020 programme for this opportunity. This publication only reflects the author’s views and neither the funding Agency nor the European Commission are responsible for any use that may be made of the information contained therein.

FundersFunder number
European Union's Horizon 2020 - Research and Innovation Framework Programme814548
European Commission
Horizon 2020

    Keywords

    • 3D-printing
    • additive manufacturing
    • catalysis
    • catalyst shaping
    • packed bed reactors
    • process intensification
    • sorbents

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