Reduction of cerebral injury in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats by amlodipine

E.L.A. Blezer, K. Nicolaij, R.C. Goldschmeding, H.A. Koomans, Jaap Joles

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    15 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel antagonists, initiated together with high salt intake, prevent the development of hypertension and subsequent cerebral damage in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). We hypothesized that the dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel antagonist amlodipine (approximately 15 mg/kg/day) could also reverse established hypertension and cerebral damage. SHRSP drank 1% NaCl from 8 weeks of age. Cerebral damage (cerebral edema and blood–brain barrier integrity) was investigated with magnetic resonance imaging twice a week. Systolic blood pressure was measured weekly. All rats developed severe hypertension and subsequent cerebral damage (defined as day 0). Untreated controls (n=7) died at day 12 (range: 7–28). Oral treatment with amlodipine (n=7), initiated at day 0, reduced systolic blood pressure, reversed cerebral edema and restored blood–brain barrier integrity. Systolic blood pressure remained low and eventually rats died after 450 days (range: 350–580) showing nephrosis but no recurrence of cerebral damage. In conclusion, established hypertension and cerebral damage are reversed by amlodipine in SHRSP.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)75-81
    JournalEuropean Journal of Pharmacology
    Volume444
    Issue number1-2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2002

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