Reactions of carboxylic acids on oxides: 1. selective hydrogenation of acetic acid to acetaldehyde R. Pestman,

R. Pestman, Remco Koster, J.A.Z. Pieterse, Vladimir Ponec

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Acetic acid has been used as a model compound in the selective
hydrogenation of aliphatic acids, which contain ®-hydrogen atoms,
to their corresponding aldehydes. In contrast to what the literature
predicts, it appeared to be possible to produce acetaldehyde directly
from acetic acid. The appropriate catalyst consists of an oxide with
an intermediate metal–oxygen bond strength. Addition of platinum
to the catalyst enhances selectivity and activity. A mechanism is
proposed, based on the involvement of lattice oxygen (viz., a Mars
and Van Krevelen mechanism) and the spill-over of activated hydrogen
from the platinum to the oxide. The most important side
reaction is the formation of acetone from two molecules of acetic
acid (ketonization), but this reaction is suppressed completely by
the addition of platinum to the catalyst.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)255–264
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Catalysis
Volume168
Publication statusPublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

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