Quantifying guest–host dynamics in supramolecular assemblies to analyze their robustness

Maartje M.C. Bastings (Corresponding author), Thomas M. Hermans, A.J.H. Spiering, Erwin W.L. Kemps, Lorenzo Albertazzi, Eva E. Kurisinkal, Patricia Y.W. Dankers (Corresponding author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

The most basic function of synthetic microenvironments for tissue engineering is to act as a physical substrate for cell attachment, migration, and proliferation, similar to the natural cell environment. Functionalization of supramolecular materials with guest compounds that display the same recognition moieties is a common strategy to introduce biofunctionality. However, besides a robust interaction with the material, a certain level of dynamics needs to be conserved for an adaptive interface toward the living environment. A balance between robust material functionalization and dynamic cell interaction needs to be met. The detailed analysis hereof using a ureido-pyrimidinone (UPy) poly(ethylene glycol) system in dilute and transient network regime is demonstrated. Monovalent and bivalent UPy-functionalized guest molecules are designed and their interaction with UPy-host fibers is evaluated. Analysis of guest interaction in the dilute state by microfluidics, and in the gel state, by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and fluorescence resonance energy transfer is proven to be suitable to quantify the local and ensemble guest mobility. The results demonstrate that the interaction of bioactive moieties through supramolecular host–guest chemistry yields a dynamic system, which is stronger for divalent guests but risks unintended leakage in the case of functional monomeric units.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1800296
Number of pages11
JournalMacromolecular Bioscience
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Pyrimidinones
Supramolecular chemistry
Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching
Photobleaching
Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer
Microfluidics
Ethylene Glycol
Tissue Engineering
Tissue engineering
Cell Communication
Polyethylene glycols
Cell Movement
Dynamical systems
Gels
Fluorescence
Cell Proliferation
Recovery
Molecules
Fibers
Substrates

Keywords

  • Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer
  • Polyethylene Glycols/chemistry
  • Pyrimidinones/chemistry
  • Tissue Engineering

Cite this

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title = "Quantifying guest–host dynamics in supramolecular assemblies to analyze their robustness",
abstract = "The most basic function of synthetic microenvironments for tissue engineering is to act as a physical substrate for cell attachment, migration, and proliferation, similar to the natural cell environment. Functionalization of supramolecular materials with guest compounds that display the same recognition moieties is a common strategy to introduce biofunctionality. However, besides a robust interaction with the material, a certain level of dynamics needs to be conserved for an adaptive interface toward the living environment. A balance between robust material functionalization and dynamic cell interaction needs to be met. The detailed analysis hereof using a ureido-pyrimidinone (UPy) poly(ethylene glycol) system in dilute and transient network regime is demonstrated. Monovalent and bivalent UPy-functionalized guest molecules are designed and their interaction with UPy-host fibers is evaluated. Analysis of guest interaction in the dilute state by microfluidics, and in the gel state, by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and fluorescence resonance energy transfer is proven to be suitable to quantify the local and ensemble guest mobility. The results demonstrate that the interaction of bioactive moieties through supramolecular host–guest chemistry yields a dynamic system, which is stronger for divalent guests but risks unintended leakage in the case of functional monomeric units.",
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Quantifying guest–host dynamics in supramolecular assemblies to analyze their robustness. / Bastings, Maartje M.C. (Corresponding author); Hermans, Thomas M.; Spiering, A.J.H.; Kemps, Erwin W.L.; Albertazzi, Lorenzo; Kurisinkal, Eva E.; Dankers, Patricia Y.W. (Corresponding author).

In: Macromolecular Bioscience, Vol. 19, No. 1, 1800296, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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