Product behavior and appearance effects on experienced engagement during experimental and goal-directed tasks

M.C. Rozendaal, D.V. Keyson, H. Ridder, de

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This study examines how digital products can be designed towards increased levels of experienced engagement. An experiment was conducted in which 24 participants were asked to interact with a videogame that varied in behavior and appearance aspects during experiential and goal-directed tasks. Behavioral aspects were manipulated by varying the amount of possibilities in the game that also affected the complexity in human action. Appearance aspects were manipulated by varying the colorfulness, detail and asymmetry within the visual design. During experiential tasks participants were free to explore the game and during goal-directed tasks participants were given a goal that had to be completed as efficiently as possible. Results indicate that experienced engagement is based upon the extent the game provided rich experiences and by the extent the game provided a sense of control. Based on these results, recommendations for designing engaging interactions with digital products are discussed.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2007 conference on Designing pleasurable products and interfaces (DPPI 2007) 22-25 August 2007, Helsinki, Finland
    Pages181-193
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2007
    Event2007 International Conference on Designing Pleasurable Products and Interfaces (DPPI 2007), August 22-25, 2007, Helsinki, Finland - Helsinki, Finland
    Duration: 22 Aug 200725 Aug 2007

    Conference

    Conference2007 International Conference on Designing Pleasurable Products and Interfaces (DPPI 2007), August 22-25, 2007, Helsinki, Finland
    Abbreviated titleDPPI 2007
    Country/TerritoryFinland
    CityHelsinki
    Period22/08/0725/08/07

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