Process intensification education contributes to sustainable development goals. Part 2

David Fernandez Rivas (Corresponding author), Daria C. Boffito, Jimmy Faria-Albanese, Jarka Glassey, Judith Cantin, Nona Afraz, Henk Akse, Kamelia V.K. Boodhoo, Rene Bos, Yi Wai Chiang, Jean Marc Commenge, Jean Luc Dubois, Federico Galli, Jan Harmsen, Siddharth Kalra, Fred Keil, Ruben Morales-Menendez, Francisco J. Navarro-Brull, Timothy Noël, Kim OgdenGregory S. Patience, David Reay, Rafael M. Santos, Ashley Smith-Schoettker, Andrzej I. Stankiewicz, Henk van den Berg, Tom van Gerven, Jeroen van Gestel, R. S. Weber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Achieving the United Nations sustainable development goals requires industry and society to develop tools and processes that work at all scales, enabling goods delivery, services, and technology to large conglomerates and remote regions. Process Intensification (PI) is a technological advance that promises to deliver means to reach these goals, but higher education has yet to totally embrace the program. Here, we present practical examples on how to better teach the principles of PI in the context of the Bloom's taxonomy and summarise the current industrial use and the future demands for PI, as a continuation of the topics discussed in Part 1. In the appendices, we provide details on the existing PI courses around the world, as well as teaching activities that are showcased during these courses to aid students’ lifelong learning. The increasing number of successful commercial cases of PI highlight the importance of PI education for both students in academia and industrial staff.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15-24
Number of pages10
JournalEducation for Chemical Engineers
Volume32
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2020

Funding

DFR acknowledges support by The Netherlands Centre for Multiscale Catalytic Energy Conversion (MCEC) , an NWO Gravitation programme funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of the government of The Netherlands . The participation by Robert Weber in the workshop and this report was supported by Laboratory Directed Research and Development funding at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) . PNNL is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for the US Department of Energy by Battelle under contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 NA acknowledges the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) - TRR 63 "Integrierte Chemische Prozesse in flüssigen Mehrphasensystemen" (Teilprojekt A10) - 56091768. The authors thank the Lorentz Centre for hosting this workshop (Educating on Process Intensification) and all attendees of the workshop for their invaluable input, vision for process intensification technologies, and candid discussions. We are also grateful to other participants who voluntarily are not co-authors of this manuscript: M. Goes (TKI Chemie), P. Huizenga (Shell), J.P. Gueneau de Mussy (KU Leuven), C. Picioreanu (TU Delft), E. Schaer (Univ. Lorraine), Mark van de Ven (National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), The Netherlands). The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of any of their funding agencies. We acknowledge the sponsors of the Lorentz’ workshop on “Educating in PI”: The MESA+Institute of the University of Twente, Sonics and Materials (USA) and the PIN-NL Dutch Process Intensification Network. DFR acknowledges support by The Netherlands Centre for Multiscale Catalytic Energy Conversion (MCEC), an NWO Gravitation programme funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of the government of The Netherlands. NA acknowledges the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) - TRR 63 “Integrierte Chemische Prozesse in flüssigen Mehrphasensystemen” (Teilprojekt A10) - 56091768. The participation by Robert Weber in the workshop and this report was supported by Laboratory Directed Research and Development funding at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for the US Department of Energy by Battelle under contract DE-AC05-76RL01830, The views and opinions of the author(s) expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights.

FundersFunder number
MCEC
Rijksinstituut voor Volksgezondheid en Milieu
Netherlands Center for Multiscale Catalytic Energy Conversion
U.S. Department of Energy
BattelleDE-AC05-76RL01830
Shell
Laboratory Directed Research and Development
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft56091768
University of Twente
Ministerie van Onderwijs, Cultuur en Wetenschap
Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek
Rijksinstituut voor Volksgezondheid en Milieu

    Keywords

    • Chemical engineering
    • Education challenge
    • Entrepreneurship
    • Industry challenge
    • Pedagogy
    • Process design
    • Process Intensification
    • Sustainability

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