Pressure drop effects on selectivity and resolution in packed column SFC

X. Lou, J.G.M. Janssen, H.M.J. Snijders, C.A.M.G. Cramers

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Abstract

The influence of pressure drop on retention, selectivity, plate height and resolution was investigated systematically in packed supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) using pure carbon dioxide as the mobile phase. Numerical methods developed previously which enabled the prediction of pressure gradients, diffusitivities, capacity factors and plate heights along the length of the column were used for the model calculations. The effects of inlet pressure and supercritical fluid flow rate on selectivity and resolution are studied. In packed column SFC with pure carbon dioxide as the mobile phase, the pressure drop can have a significant effect on resolution. The calculated data are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. Flow rate is shown to have a larger effect than generally realized. Finally, the possibilities and limitations of using long packed columns in SFC are discussed. It is demonstrated that long columns with large plate numbers do not necessarily yield better separations.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Eighteenth International Symposium on Capillary Chromatography, Riva del Garda, 20-24 May 1996
EditorsP Sandra, W. Bertsch, P. Sandra, G. Devos
Place of PublicationHeidelberg
PublisherHuethig
Pages1856-1867
Publication statusPublished - 1996
Event18th International Symposium on Capillary Chromatography, May 20-24, 1996, Riva del Garda, Italy - Riva del Garda, Italy
Duration: 20 May 199624 May 1996

Conference

Conference18th International Symposium on Capillary Chromatography, May 20-24, 1996, Riva del Garda, Italy
CountryItaly
CityRiva del Garda
Period20/05/9624/05/96

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