Pleasure to play, arousal to stay : the effect of player emotions on digital game preferences and playing time

K. Poels, W.M. Hoogen, van den, W.A. IJsselsteijn, Y.A.W. Kort, de

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

37 Citations (Scopus)
4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This study investigated how player emotions during game-play, measured through self-report and physiological recordings, predict playing time and game preferences. We distinguished between short-term (immediately after game-play) and long-term (after 3 weeks) playing time and game preferences. While pleasure was most predictive for short-term playing time and game preferences, arousal, particularly for game preferences, was most predictive on the longer term. This result was found through both self-report and physiological emotion measures. This study initiates theorizing about digital gaming as a hedonic consumer product and sketches future research endeavors of this topic.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalCyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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