Mood measurement with Pick-A-Mood: Review of current methods and design of a pictorial self-report scale

P.M.A. Desmet, M.H. Vastenburg, N. Romero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper introduces Pick-A-Mood, a character-based pictorial scale for reporting and expressing moods. Pick-A-Mood consists of three characters that each express eight mood states, representing four main categories: excited and cheerful (for energised-pleasant), irritated and tense (for energised-unpleasant), relaxed and calm (for calm-pleasant), and bored and sad (for calm-unpleasant). Using Pick-A-Mood requires little effort on the part of respondents, making it suitable for design research applications in which people often have little time or motivation to report their moods. Contrary to what is often assumed, mood and emotion are distinct phenomena with different measurable manifestations. These differences are discussed, and a review of existing methods is provided, indicating to what extent current methods that measure emotion are suitable for measuring mood. The development and validation of Pick-A-Mood is reported, and application examples and research opportunities are discussed.

LanguageEnglish
Pages241-279
Number of pages39
JournalJournal of Design Research
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Design for mood
  • Measurement method review
  • Mood measurement
  • Pictorial affect scale

Cite this

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Mood measurement with Pick-A-Mood : Review of current methods and design of a pictorial self-report scale. / Desmet, P.M.A.; Vastenburg, M.H.; Romero, N.

In: Journal of Design Research, Vol. 14, No. 3, 2016, p. 241-279.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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