Mobile applications for incident reporting systems in urban contexts: Lessons learned from an empirical study

Cédric Bach, Regina Bernhaupt, Caio Stein D'Agostini, Marco Winckler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Many governments are now promoting the use of mobile applications allowing citizens to report incidents in their neighborhood to the administration. Such applications are sought to sense the quality of the environment thus enabling authorities to promote safety and well-being among citizens. However, little is known about how users perceive incident reporting systems and which factors affect the user experience (UX) and the perception of risk. In this paper we present some lessons learned from an empirical study involving twenty users engaged in reporting urban incidents using a mobile application. A significant result from the present study is to point out how and which UX dimensions can be effectively used as triggers to motivate users to report incidents. Based on citizens' perception of urban incidents, we discuss how to build innovative incident reporting systems that can improve the communication between citizens and administrations.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationECCE 2013 - Proceedings of the 31st European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics
Subtitle of host publicationWork, Education, Society
Pages1-10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2013
Externally publishedYes
Event31st European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics: Work, Education, Society, ECCE 2013 - Toulouse, France
Duration: 26 Aug 201328 Aug 2013

Publication series

NameACM International Conference Proceeding Series

Conference

Conference31st European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics: Work, Education, Society, ECCE 2013
CountryFrance
CityToulouse
Period26/08/1328/08/13

Keywords

  • government
  • incident reporting
  • mobile
  • user experience

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