Log skeletons: a classification approach to process discovery

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    Abstract

    To test the effectiveness of process discovery algorithms, a Process Discovery Contest (PDC) has been set up. This PDC uses a classification approach to measure this effectiveness: The better the discovered model can classify whether or not a new trace conforms to the event log, the better the discovery algorithm is supposed to be. Unfortunately, even the state-of-the-art fully-automated discovery algorithms score poorly on this classification. Even the best of these algorithms, the Inductive Miner, scored only 147 correct classified traces out of 200 traces on the PDC of 2017. This paper introduces the rule-based log skeleton model, which is closely related to the Declare constraint model, together with a way to classify traces using this model. This classification using log skeletons is shown to score better on the PDC of 2017 than state-of-the-art discovery algorithms: 194 out of 200. As a result, one can argue that the fully-automated algorithm to construct (or: discover) a log skeleton from an event log outperforms existing state-of-the-art fully-automated discovery algorithms.
    Original languageEnglish
    PublisherarXiv.org
    Number of pages30
    Publication statusPublished - 2018

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