Left ventricular shear strain in model and experiment

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Abstract

Mathematical modeling of cardiac mechanics could be a useful clinical tool, both in translating measured abnormalities in cardiac deformation into the underlying pathology, and in selecting a propertreatment. We investigated to what extent a previously published model of cardiac mechanics could predict deformation in the healthy left ventricle, as measured using MR tagging. The model adequately predicts circumferential strain, but fails to accurately predict shear strain. However, the time course of shear strain proves to be that sensitive tomyofiber orientation, that agreement between model predictions and experiment may be expected if fiber orientation is changed by only a few degrees.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFunctional Imaging and Modeling of the Heart 2005
PublisherSpringer
Pages314-324
ISBN (Print)978-3-540-26161-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005
Event3rd International Workshop on Functional Imaging and Modeling of the Heart (FIMH 2005), June 2-4, 2005, Barcelona, Spain - Barcelona, Spain
Duration: 2 Jun 20054 Jun 2005

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science
Volume3504
ISSN (Print)0302-9743

Workshop

Workshop3rd International Workshop on Functional Imaging and Modeling of the Heart (FIMH 2005), June 2-4, 2005, Barcelona, Spain
Abbreviated titleFIMH 2005
CountrySpain
CityBarcelona
Period2/06/054/06/05

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    Ubbink, S., Bovendeerd, P. H. M., Delhaas, T., Arts, M. G. J., & Vosse, van de, F. N. (2005). Left ventricular shear strain in model and experiment. In Functional Imaging and Modeling of the Heart 2005 (pp. 314-324). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science; Vol. 3504). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/11494621_32