Investigating daytime effects of correlated colour temperature on experiences, performance, and arousal

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Abstract

Research in the late evening and at night has shown that acute activating effects of light are particularly sensitive to short-wavelength light. Yet, findings on such effects during daytime are still inconclusive. This study (N=39) investigated effects of correlated colour temperature (CCT; 2700 K vs. 6000 K, 500 lx on the desk) on individuals’ experiences, performance, and physiology during one hour of exposure in the morning versus afternoon. Except for a higher subjective vitality in the 6000 K condition in the morning, results showed no significant activating effects, and even subtle performance-undermining effects in the high CCT condition. Moreover, participants rated both their mood and the light settings as less positive in the 6000 K vs. 2700 K condition. It is therefore questionable whether lighting solutions with commonly experienced intensity levels should provide a higher CCT during daytime office hours
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)80-93
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Environmental Psychology
Volume50
Issue numberJuni 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2017

Keywords

  • Alertness
  • Cognitive performance
  • Correlated colour temperature
  • Daytime
  • Vitality

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