Investigating daytime effects of correlated colour temperature on experiences, performance, and arousal

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Abstract

Research in the late evening and at night has shown that acute activating effects of light are particularly sensitive to short-wavelength light. Yet, findings on such effects during daytime are still inconclusive. This study (N=39) investigated effects of correlated colour temperature (CCT; 2700 K vs. 6000 K, 500 lx on the desk) on individuals’ experiences, performance, and physiology during one hour of exposure in the morning versus afternoon. Except for a higher subjective vitality in the 6000 K condition in the morning, results showed no significant activating effects, and even subtle performance-undermining effects in the high CCT condition. Moreover, participants rated both their mood and the light settings as less positive in the 6000 K vs. 2700 K condition. It is therefore questionable whether lighting solutions with commonly experienced intensity levels should provide a higher CCT during daytime office hours
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)80-93
JournalJournal of Environmental Psychology
Volume50
Issue numberJuni 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2017

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Arousal
Color
Light
Temperature
Lighting
Research

Keywords

  • correlated colour temperature
  • alertness
  • vitality
  • performance
  • daytime

Cite this

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title = "Investigating daytime effects of correlated colour temperature on experiences, performance, and arousal",
abstract = "Research in the late evening and at night has shown that acute activating effects of light are particularly sensitive to short-wavelength light. Yet, findings on such effects during daytime are still inconclusive. This study (N=39) investigated effects of correlated colour temperature (CCT; 2700 K vs. 6000 K, 500 lx on the desk) on individuals’ experiences, performance, and physiology during one hour of exposure in the morning versus afternoon. Except for a higher subjective vitality in the 6000 K condition in the morning, results showed no significant activating effects, and even subtle performance-undermining effects in the high CCT condition. Moreover, participants rated both their mood and the light settings as less positive in the 6000 K vs. 2700 K condition. It is therefore questionable whether lighting solutions with commonly experienced intensity levels should provide a higher CCT during daytime office hours",
keywords = "correlated colour temperature, alertness, vitality, performance, daytime",
author = "K.C.H.J. Smolders and {de Kort}, Y.A.W.",
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language = "English",
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journal = "Journal of Environmental Psychology",
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Investigating daytime effects of correlated colour temperature on experiences, performance, and arousal. / Smolders, K.C.H.J.; de Kort, Y.A.W.

In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, Vol. 50, No. Juni 2017, 06.2017, p. 80-93.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Smolders, K.C.H.J.

AU - de Kort, Y.A.W.

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AB - Research in the late evening and at night has shown that acute activating effects of light are particularly sensitive to short-wavelength light. Yet, findings on such effects during daytime are still inconclusive. This study (N=39) investigated effects of correlated colour temperature (CCT; 2700 K vs. 6000 K, 500 lx on the desk) on individuals’ experiences, performance, and physiology during one hour of exposure in the morning versus afternoon. Except for a higher subjective vitality in the 6000 K condition in the morning, results showed no significant activating effects, and even subtle performance-undermining effects in the high CCT condition. Moreover, participants rated both their mood and the light settings as less positive in the 6000 K vs. 2700 K condition. It is therefore questionable whether lighting solutions with commonly experienced intensity levels should provide a higher CCT during daytime office hours

KW - correlated colour temperature

KW - alertness

KW - vitality

KW - performance

KW - daytime

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JF - Journal of Environmental Psychology

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