Interrole conflict and self-efficacy to manage work and family demands mediate the relationships of job and family demands with stress in the job and family domains

E. Smoktunowicz, R. Cieslak, E. Demerouti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and objectives: This study derives from Work–Home Resources model (ten Brummelhuis, L. L., & Bakker, A. B. (2012). A resource perspective on the work–home interface: The work–home resources model. American Psychologist, 67(7), 545–556. doi:10.1037/a0027974) and Social Cognitive Theory (Bandura, A. (1986). Social foundations of thought and action: A social cognitive theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ, US: Prentice-Hall, Inc.) to investigate mechanisms responsible for the effect of job and family demands on work- and family-related perceived stress. We hypothesized that interrole conflict and self-efficacy to manage work and family demands operate either independently or sequentially transmitting the effects of demands on perceived stress. Design: A sample of 100 employees of various occupations participated in the study conducted online in two waves: Time 1 (T1) and Time 2 (T2) with a three-month interval. Method: Regression analysis with bootstrapping was applied. Results: Interrole conflict (T1) did not mediate the relationships between demands (T1) and perceived stress (T2), whereas self-efficacy (T1) mediated only those between family demands (T1) and stress (T2). However, data supported the sequential mediation hypotheses: Demands (T1) were associated with increased interrole conflict (T1) which in turn decreased self-efficacy (T1) and ultimately resulted in the elevated perceived stress at work and in the family (T2). Conclusions: Demands originating in one domain can impact stress both in the same and other life areas through the sequence of interrole conflict and context-specific self-efficacy. KEYWORDS: Demands, family–work conflict, work–family conflict, self-efficacy, stress
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)485-497
Number of pages13
JournalAnxiety, Stress and Coping
Volume30
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Sep 2017

Keywords

  • Demands
  • family–work conflict
  • self-efficacy
  • stress
  • work–family conflict
  • Self Efficacy
  • Family Conflict/psychology
  • Humans
  • Middle Aged
  • Family/psychology
  • Stress, Psychological/etiology
  • Models, Psychological
  • Male
  • Work-Life Balance
  • Young Adult
  • Occupational Stress/psychology
  • Adult
  • Female
  • Surveys and Questionnaires

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