Imaging the In Vivo Degradation of Tissue Engineering Implants by Use of Supramolecular Radiopaque Biomaterials

Hanna Talacua, Serge H M Söntjens, Shraddha H Thakkar, Aurelie M A Brizard, Lex A van Herwerden, Aryan Vink, Geert C van Almen, Patricia Y W Dankers (Corresponding author), Carlijn V C Bouten, Ricardo P J Budde, Henk M Janssen, Jolanda Kluin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For in situ tissue engineering (TE) applications it is important that implant degradation proceeds in concord with neo-tissue formation to avoid graft failure. It will therefore be valuable to have an imaging contrast agent (CA) available that can report on the degrading implant. For this purpose, a biodegradable radiopaque biomaterial is presented, modularly composed of a bisurea chain-extended polycaprolactone (PCL2000-U4U) elastomer and a novel iodinated bisurea-modified CA additive (I-U4U). Supramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions between the components ensure their intimate mixing. Porous implant TE-grafts are prepared by simply electrospinning a solution containing PCL2000-U4U and I-U4U. Rats receive an aortic interposition graft, either composed of only PCL2000-U4U (control) or of PCL2000-U4U and I-U4U (test). The grafts are explanted for analysis at three time points over a 1-month period. Computed tomography imaging of the test group implants prior to explantation shows a decrease in iodide volume and density over time. Explant analysis also indicates scaffold degradation. (Immuno)histochemistry shows comparable cellular contents and a similar neo-tissue formation process for test and control group, demonstrating that the CA does not have apparent adverse effects. A supramolecular approach to create solid radiopaque biomaterials can therefore be used to noninvasively monitor the biodegradation of synthetic implants.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2000024
Number of pages14
JournalMacromolecular Bioscience
Volume20
Issue number7
Early online date17 Jun 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2020

Bibliographical note

© 2020 The Authors. Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

Funding

This research formed part of the iValve project of the research program of the BioMedical Materials institute, co-founded by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation. The financial contribution of the Nederlandse Hartstichting is most gratefully acknowledged. All members of the iValve project are thanked for valuable discussions. Joost L.J. van Dongen, Xianwen Lou (from the Macromolecular and Organic Chemistry group at the TU/e Eindhoven, the Netherlands) and Michel Fransen (SyMO-Chem BV) are thanked for their contributions and help on MS (HRMS, MALDI-TOF-MS, HPLC-MS and GC-MS) and GPC measurements. This research formed part of the iValve project of the research program of the BioMedical Materials institute, co‐founded by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation. The financial contribution of the Nederlandse Hartstichting is most gratefully acknowledged. All members of the iValve project are thanked for valuable discussions. Joost L.J. van Dongen, Xianwen Lou (from the Macromolecular and Organic Chemistry group at the TU/e Eindhoven, the Netherlands) and Michel Fransen (SyMO‐Chem BV) are thanked for their contributions and help on MS (HRMS, MALDI‐TOF‐MS, HPLC‐MS and GC‐MS) and GPC measurements.

FundersFunder number
BioMedical Materials institute
Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation
Ministerie van Economische Zaken en Klimaat

    Keywords

    • aortic interposition graft implants
    • computed tomography imaging
    • degrading supramolecular biomaterials
    • modular contrast agents
    • tissue engineering

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