Hydrogen storage in sonicated carbon materials

M. Hirscher, M. Becher, M. Haluska, U. Dettlaff-Weglikowska, A. Quintel, G.S. Duesberg, Y.J. Choi, P. Downes, M. Hulman, S. Roth, I. Stepanek, P. Bernier

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Abstract

The hydrogen storage in purified single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), graphite and diamond powder was investigated at room temperature and ambient pressure. The samples were sonicated in 5 M HNO3 for various periods of time using an ultrasonic probe of the alloy Ti-6Al-4V. The goal of this treatment was to open the carbon nanotubes. The maximum value of overall hydrogen storage was found to be 1.5 wt¿%, as determined by thermal desorption spectroscopy. The storage capacity increases with sonication time. The sonication treatment introduces particles of the Ti alloy into the samples, as shown by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and chemical analysis. All of the hydrogen uptake can be explained by the assumption that the hydrogen is only stored in the Ti-alloy particles. The presence of Ti-alloy particles does not allow the determination of whether a small amount of hydrogen possibly is stored in the SWNTs themselves, and the fraction of nanotubes opened by the sonication treatment is unknown.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)129-132
JournalApplied Physics A: Materials Science & Processing
Volume72
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Carbon Nanotubes
Sonication
Hydrogen storage
Hydrogen
Carbon
Carbon nanotubes
Thermal desorption spectroscopy
Diamond
Graphite
Powders
Nanotubes
Ultrasonics
Transmission electron microscopy
X ray diffraction
Diamonds
Chemical analysis
Temperature

Cite this

Hirscher, M., Becher, M., Haluska, M., Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U., Quintel, A., Duesberg, G. S., ... Bernier, P. (2001). Hydrogen storage in sonicated carbon materials. Applied Physics A: Materials Science & Processing, 72(2), 129-132. https://doi.org/10.1007/s003390100816
Hirscher, M. ; Becher, M. ; Haluska, M. ; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U. ; Quintel, A. ; Duesberg, G.S. ; Choi, Y.J. ; Downes, P. ; Hulman, M. ; Roth, S. ; Stepanek, I. ; Bernier, P. / Hydrogen storage in sonicated carbon materials. In: Applied Physics A: Materials Science & Processing. 2001 ; Vol. 72, No. 2. pp. 129-132.
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author = "M. Hirscher and M. Becher and M. Haluska and U. Dettlaff-Weglikowska and A. Quintel and G.S. Duesberg and Y.J. Choi and P. Downes and M. Hulman and S. Roth and I. Stepanek and P. Bernier",
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Hirscher, M, Becher, M, Haluska, M, Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U, Quintel, A, Duesberg, GS, Choi, YJ, Downes, P, Hulman, M, Roth, S, Stepanek, I & Bernier, P 2001, 'Hydrogen storage in sonicated carbon materials', Applied Physics A: Materials Science & Processing, vol. 72, no. 2, pp. 129-132. https://doi.org/10.1007/s003390100816

Hydrogen storage in sonicated carbon materials. / Hirscher, M.; Becher, M.; Haluska, M.; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Quintel, A.; Duesberg, G.S.; Choi, Y.J.; Downes, P.; Hulman, M.; Roth, S.; Stepanek, I.; Bernier, P.

In: Applied Physics A: Materials Science & Processing, Vol. 72, No. 2, 2001, p. 129-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Hirscher, M.

AU - Becher, M.

AU - Haluska, M.

AU - Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.

AU - Quintel, A.

AU - Duesberg, G.S.

AU - Choi, Y.J.

AU - Downes, P.

AU - Hulman, M.

AU - Roth, S.

AU - Stepanek, I.

AU - Bernier, P.

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AB - The hydrogen storage in purified single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), graphite and diamond powder was investigated at room temperature and ambient pressure. The samples were sonicated in 5 M HNO3 for various periods of time using an ultrasonic probe of the alloy Ti-6Al-4V. The goal of this treatment was to open the carbon nanotubes. The maximum value of overall hydrogen storage was found to be 1.5 wt¿%, as determined by thermal desorption spectroscopy. The storage capacity increases with sonication time. The sonication treatment introduces particles of the Ti alloy into the samples, as shown by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and chemical analysis. All of the hydrogen uptake can be explained by the assumption that the hydrogen is only stored in the Ti-alloy particles. The presence of Ti-alloy particles does not allow the determination of whether a small amount of hydrogen possibly is stored in the SWNTs themselves, and the fraction of nanotubes opened by the sonication treatment is unknown.

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Hirscher M, Becher M, Haluska M, Dettlaff-Weglikowska U, Quintel A, Duesberg GS et al. Hydrogen storage in sonicated carbon materials. Applied Physics A: Materials Science & Processing. 2001;72(2):129-132. https://doi.org/10.1007/s003390100816